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ANNUAL VISITATION REGION/AREA

^TRO REGION

BARR LAKE CASTLEWOOD CHATFIELD CHERRY CREEK ELDORADO GOLDEN GATE KIGHLINE CANAL ROX 30 ROUGH STAUNTON SUB TOTAL 4-23-86 VISPCT2 FY 80-81 FY 81-82 FY 82-83 FY 83-84 FY 84-85 115,057 50,747 1,112,063 1,286,164 112,025 594,493 16,972 759 0 101,850 68,434 1,130,789 1,302,053 110,901 519,937 15,280 1, 388 0 100,144 69,710 953,455 1,264,996 115,893 555,751 16,210 2, 901 0 102,871 69,481 1,046,483 1,522,745 127,021 623,941 28,218 3, 999 0 114,790 67,946 1,036,762 1,279,922 141,434 529,760 0 11,246 0

3,288,280 3,250,632 3,079,060 3,524,759 3,181,860

NORTH REGION BARBOUR PONDS BOYD LAKE JACKSON LORY STATS FORSST

tTEAMBOAT

Pb TOTAL

FY 80-81 FY 81-82 FY 82-83 FY 83-84 FY 84-85 118,275 372,454 231,413 63,090 80,774 249,875 120,780 136,100 225,474 66,730 80,961 242,886 107,175 194,544 273,875 61,219 79,950 245,654 88,950 265,525 289,536 65,139 85,064 275,805 102,592 287,690 281,400 70,056 85,299 237,181

1,115,881

872,931

962,417 1,070,019 1,114,218

SOUTH REGION BONNY ELEVEN MILE LATHRDP PUEB LO TRINIDAD MUELLER SUB TOTAL FY 80-81 FY 81-82 FY 82-83 FY 83-84 FY 84-85

200,792

192,800

194,946

191,039

193,892

178,261

194,776

190,922

275,365

351,328

192,752

201,717

227,146

177,434

167,526

701,599

604.903

675,539

906,821 1,287,685

174,450

200,225

176,873

197,741

191,524

0 182 0 0 0

1,447,854 1,394,603 1,465,426 1,748,400 2,191,955

WEST REGION CRAWFORD HIGHLINE ISLAND ACHES NAVAJO PAONIA

^^LE GAP/FALLS

^PllTZER

Wga SUB TOTAL ' total FY 80-81 FY 81-82 FY 82-83 FY 83-84 FY 84-85 68,225 240,405 82,725 132,336 16,040 143,820 77,493 90,051 77,126 247,225 79,725 135,513 24,073 163,193 87,156 94,493 851,095 908,504 85,163 69,000 68,823 204,200 213 , 055 210,312 73,996 50,143 62,406 132,596 133,352 129,825 17,567 20,937 16,759 138,520 151,714 120,735 89,581 92,079 96,345 85 ,529 84,647 86,022 827, 152 814,927 791,227 334,055 7,158,105 7,279,260

(3)

DIVISION OF PARKS AND OUTDOOR RECREATION

PARKS MAiNAGER VISITATION REPORT WITH REGIONAL SUBTOTALS FY 85-86

VISITS VISITS

SAME MONTH THIS «/•--0 VISITS VISITS "Q

REGION AREA NAME MONTH LAST TEAR MONTH INC/DEC LAST YTD THIS YTD'iNC/DEC

metro"" barr'lakI JUNE 19423 19500 0.4% 114790 ""120384 479%

METRO CASTLEWOOD JUNE 11016 9566 -13.2% 67946 75264 10.3%

METRO CHATFIELD JUNE 221303 219323 -0.9% 1036762 1131473 9.1%

METRO CHERRY CREEK JUNE 271326 277253 2.2% 1279922 1303911 2.3% METRO ELDORADO JUNE 22373 36989 65.3% 141434 180456 27.6%

METRO GOLDEN GATE JUNE 67585 77720 15.0% 529760 499648 -5.7%

METRO ROXBOROUGH JUNE 779 1403 30.1% 11246 4773 -57.6%

METRO STAUNTON JUNE 0 0 0.0% 0 0 0.0%

SUBTOTAL

>

~6l3310 ""641759 4.6%'sislseo 3320909 4.4%

NORTH BARBOUR PONDS JUNE 16300 25652 52.7% 102592 124614 21.5%

NORTH BOYD LAKE JLTvE 36000 110500 23.5% 237690 455336 53.4%

NORTH JACKSON JIRJE 53500 68000 16.2% 231400 316200 12.4%

NORTH LORY JUNE 15360 16774 9.2% 70056 76244 3.a%

NORTH STATE FOREST JUNE 10000 30000 200.0% 85299 109045 27.8%

NORTH STEAMBOAT JUNE 53936 62104 5.4% 287131 293570 2.2%

SUBTOTAL 245596 313030 27.0% 1114213"l375^ 23.5%

SOUTH BO.NNY JUNE 43444 44412 2.2% 193392 194799 0.5%

SOUTH ELEVEN MILE JUNE 44362 43770 -2.4% 351328 239164 -17.7%

SOUTH LATHROP JUNE 26333 37425 42.1% 167526 183297 9.4%

SOUTH MLELLER JUNE 259 155 -40.2% 470 413 -12.1%

SOUTH PUEBLO JUNE 243123 264615 3.a% 1237685 1524098 13.4%

SOUTH TRINIDAD JUNE 27013 19016 -29.6% 191524 170234 -11.1%

SUBTOTAL ~~335049 409393 6.3%'2192425 "2362005 777%

WEST CRAWFORD JLOfE 12639 14085 11.0% 63323 77744 13.0%

WEST HIGHLINE JLTNE 34537 15213 -56.0% 210312 100471 -52.2%

WEST ISLAND ACRES JUNE 9733 5362 -45.2% 62406 51954 -16.7%

WEST NAVAJO JUNE 20522 16645 -9.1% 129325 119563 -7.9%

WEST PAONIA JUNE 619 171 -72.4% 16759 19057 13.7%

WEST RIFLE GAP/FALLSJUNE 21370 23962 9.6% 120735 119590 -0.9%

WEST SWEITZER JUT-E 21755 22031 1.3% 96345 104014 8.0%

WEST VEGA JLTVE 14078 15640 11.1% 36022 86650 0.7%

SUBTOTAL ""135908 115114 ""^573%"'"79I227 ""679043 "-1472%

(4)

FY 86-3/

DIVISION OF P.ARKS AND OLTDCOR RECRE.ATION

P.^J?KS MANAGER VISITATION REPORT VITH REGIONAL SLBTCTAI^

REGION AEEA NA>E

^eteo safe lake

^ETRO CASHErt'OCD

METRO CHATFIEIi) METRO CHERRY CREEK METRO ELDORADO

METRO GOLDEN GATE

METRO ROXBORCLGH METRO STALTVTON SL3TCTAT

VISITS VISITS

SA'E MONTH THIS % VISITS MONTH LAST YEAR MONTH INC/DEC LAST YID

JLNE 19500 19000 -2.6% 121386 JLNE 9566 6300 -34.1% 76254 JUNE 219328 224377 2.3% 1131473 JUNE 277253 246823 -11.0% 1308911 JUNE 36986 20790 -43.8% 179456 JLNE 77720 90629 16.6% 499648 JUNE 1403 7944 466.2% 4773 JLNE 0 0 0-0% 0 VISITS 116252 44212 -42.0% 1138454 1300019 159483 529523 20607 0 0.6% -0.7% -11.1% 6.0% 331.7% 0.0%

641756

615863

-4,0% 3321901 3308550

-0.4%

NORTH EARBCLR FONTS JLNE

NORTH BOTO LAKE JUNt

NCRTH JACKSON JUNE

NORTH LORY JUNE

NORTH PICNTC ROCK JUNE

NORTH STATE FOREST JLNE

^•CRTH

STEA>EOAT JLNE SLETOT.AL 25652 27575 7.5% 121593 163291 34.3% 110500 126900 14.8% 455336 475630 4.3% 58000 60000 3.4% 3062G0 318000 O QIV 16774 18966 13.1% 75974 77084 1 sa/ 1 • vA/O 0 4200 0.0% 0 7583 0.0% 30000 28000 -6.7% 109045 138813 27.3% 62104 54466 -12.3% 293770 289593 -1.4% 303030 320107 5.6% 1362418 1469994 7.9%

SOLTH BONTTY JLTTE SCLTH ELEVEN MILE JUNE SOLTH LATHROP JL^T SOLTH MUELLER JUNE SOLTH FLEBLO JUNE SOLTH TRINIDAD JUHE

SUBTOTAL

WEST CRAWFORD JUNE WEST HIGHLINE JUNE WEST ISLAND ACRES JUNE

WEST NAVAJO JUNE WEST PAONI.A JUHE WEST RIFLE aVP/F.ALLSJUNE WEST SWEITZER JUNE

WEST VEGA JUNE

SUBTOTAL

'

TOTAL 44412 47410 S.8% 194799 182001 -6.6% 43770 50332 15.0% 289164 275997 -4.6% 37425 37457 0.1% 183297 200098 9.2% 155 328 305.2% 413 4284 937.3% 264615 279124 5.5% 1524098 1596648 4.8% 19016 24305 30.4% 170234 180247 5.9% 409393 439756 7.4% 2362005 2439275 0 • o/o 14085 19230 36.5% 77742 83463 7.4% 15218 24902 63.6% 100471 110422 9.9% 5362 10246 91.1% 51750 68160 31.7% 18645 20337 9.1% 119563 114990 -3.8% 171 664 288.3% 19057 16348 -11.6% 19170 25540 33.2% 112245 124087 10.6% 22031 17467 -20.7% 104014 102753 -1.2% 15640 16635 6.4% 86395 85535 -0.9% 110322 135021 22.4% 671237 706313 C 00/ 1464501 151C747 :.2% 7717561

(5)

>ear lur iwo mspecuons. iosutuuons sucn as tbe Mesa County Jail and the Grand Junction Regional Center will be charged |100 annually. Septic tank owners will be charged

11.50 for a boddet of regulations that had been free.

The county will delay setting or charging fees for private restaurant inspections until July 1, said Eckert, because the

carrying out state-mandated programs, he said.'

Counties lose money because the legislature sets specific

fees for the multitude of programs, "and then they don't "

change those laws for years and years while inflation goes i

up, our manpower costs and all of our other costs at the * county level rise," said Eckert.

w

r

h V. 'm im. m ASSOCIATED PflESS

iiyiga mountain out of a snow hill

the only place sprouting mini-mountains of plowed snow From

Wayne

"Wemhoff, Jennifer Jackson and Wayne's-ststei, Rliea, played

^®?^?cotys High School in Cofurr^i s^'.

tfi,esday.

~ Yislts up

4%

at park sites

in iColorado

By JOE GARNER

Rocky Mountain News Staff Writer

Visitors to the 10 National Park Service sites in Colorado increased b> 4% through November, but the

year-end total probably will be a

half-million short of the record 6.2

million tourists in 1978, an agency official said yesterday.

While attendance declined at four

sites, the upsurge at the others lift

ed the total to 5.7 million for the first 11 months of last year, said

Kenneth Hornback, chief of the

park service's statistics office in Lakewood. That compares with 5.4 million for the corresponding peri od in 1986.

Hornback said December visitor

figures, not yet reported, tradition ally are so small they have no ap-pri^iable impact on the total.

L

"The big question is whether Col

orado will continue to have growth in 1988," he said. "We haven't made tte forecast, but my personal view is that 1988 will remain un changed."

But that prediction could be

knocked askew next summer if the continued cheap dollar brings an in flux of big-spending Asian and Eu

ropean tourists on the trail of the Wild West, he said.

The Colorado Tourism Board ear lier reported a similar 3.6 7o in crease in visitors in June through Ai^Eust. "ifhe number of visitors statewide and to the national park sites cannot be directly correlated, but the figures tend to move in the

same direction, said Don Merrion,

research manager for agency. Nationwide, a record 286.1 mil lion visitors toured the 311 National Park Service sites through Decem ber, based on computer estimates,

Hornback said.

In Colorado, attendance in

creased at these sites: Mesa Verde

and Rocky Mountain national parks,

and Colorado, Florissant Fossil Beds, Great Sand Dunes and

Hoven-weep national monuments.

It decreased at Bent's Old Fort National Historic Site, Curecanti National Recreation Area, and Black Canyon of the Gunnison and

(6)

WILDLIFE CDNSULTING SERVICES

1 4361 ROLLING HILLS DRIVE • MONTROSE. CO • 31 401

Robert K* Rosette • Chief Conaultant and General Manager

I — 303»249«7S15

DATE: July 29, 198?

7

TO: Tyler Martlneau

HDR Infrastructure '\ • .-''V

N' .

FROM: Bot Rosette

Rosette Wildlife Consulting Service

Re: Trends in Cold Water Sport Fishing

I attended a special meeting of the Colorado Wildlife Commission in Glenwood Springs on July 9, at the Hot Springs Inn. The purpose of the meeting was to receive public input on proposed changes in fishing regulations. The Wildlife Commission will make actual changes in the regulations at a September meeting in Montrose. The purpose of this memo is to advise you of apparent trends in cold water sport fishing

in Colorado as perceived from the meeting and subsequent conversations

with Colorado Division of Wildlife Managers and Fisheries Specialists. Denver based Fisheries Program Specialists with the Colorado Division of Wildlife are currently assessing the result of a recent fisherman survey. Preliminary results of the survey indicate:

* Over the past 20 years fisherman numbers have increased

at a rate of approximately 3^ per year, this trend continues.

* Interest in warm water fishing is currently increasing more rapidly than cold water fishing.

* 52% of cold water anglers surveyed indicated at one

time or another they have fished in a lake or reservoir.

* 33% of cold water anglers surveyed indicated that at one

time or another they fished in a stream.

I ran my perceptions of the Glenwood Springs Wildlife Commission

meeting past Wildlife Division people present at the meeting and the following trends seemed agreed upon:

* The Trout Unlimited Organization is a strong advocate of increasing stream miles under special Catch and Release or Slot Limit regulations.

(7)

Tyler Martineau Page 2

July 29, 198?

* The Colorado Wildlife Federation is composed of members with more diverse interests and although supportive of

some additional Catch and Release waters with Terminal

Tackle restrictions,they also want some of Colorado's top trout streams managed without restrictive Catch ajid

Release and Terminal Tackle regulations.

* Introduction of mysis shrimp to many Colorado reservoirs

has been detrimental to the kokanee salmon fishery in

several major reservoirs. The Wildlife Division sees an opportunity to manage these reservoirs for trophy

mackinaw trout by increasing the size of mackinaw legal to keep. Commercial interests from the Granby Reservoir area presented a petition to the Wildlife Commission at Glenwood Springs opposing a change in the mackinaw regulation and supportive of improving the kokanee fishing in .the reservoir. The same problem seems to exist at Taylor Reservoir.

Discussions with Wildlife Division Personnel after the Glenwood Springs meeting revealed other trends perceived by them;

* Increased interest in re-establishing naturally reproducing rainbow trout strains into historic spawning streams.

* Increased interest in trout strains such as the

McConaughy rainbow trout that reach a large size

in lakes and reservoirs and are often successful spawners.

It should be added that the Colorado Division of Wildlife is on record as supporting diversity of fishing opportunity in the state i.e.,

(8)

RC/12Dec8S/ 1

MEMO

From;

RECREATION FORECASTS (second draft)

Comprehensive Recreational Planning CotniE:lttee

Members, Participants, and Interested Others

Ralph Clark

At the August meeting it was decided to bring together the projections

of future recreational activity within the Gunnison Country Area and

to present these in a common format. A first draft was circulated

earlier. Offered suggestions and revisions are reflected in this

attached second draft. This memo is to provide a brief explanation

of: (a.) why consolidate such projections; <b.) »4hat is this

collection of figures; (c.) what do the figures represent; (d.) some

tentative conclusions; and (e.> what happens next.

A.

WHY CONSOLIDATE PROJECTIONS?

A common oieasure of reported

and projected recreational activity is needed to give an indication of

what the Gunnison Country might expect -

in total. A "Recreational

Visitor Day" (RVDs) defined as 12 hours of recreational activity by

one or more persons is the measure selected. This measure can be

matched against requirements for supporting facilities and services

both private and public, within the area. Consolidated projections^

updated from time to time with experience and new assumptions, ser-ve

as the foundation for better communication among all those conc^ned

with the management of recreational activity and resources within this

area.

B.

WHAT IS THIS COLLECTION OF FIGURES?

It is a prirft'but froe a

computerized "electronic spreadsheet" used to organize and process the

information drawn from the agencies.

This tool makes it easy to

correct and update the assembled information without having to redo

the whole thing. It also makes possible a display of how conversions

are made to achieve the common format of RVDs and it facilitates

review and correction.

At the beginning of the sequence (rows 1 through 72 and coluawis A

through H) are listed the agencies and the many different recreational

activities on which they report. Also in these columns are factors

used for conversion of reported information into the common format.

To the right (columns 1 onward) are reported and projected activity

figures, converted when necessary to the common format of RVDs.

Reported figures from several past years are for comparison with the

year by year projections extending through the year 2000.

Rows 75 through 145 contain the initial draft of a comparison

between the amount of non-camping recreational activity on public land

within the Gunnison Country Area and publicly provided or developed

accommodation facilities.

Many gaps remain to be filled in as well as necessary refineoent

of information presented. Use of an electronic spreadsheet makes both

easy to accomplish — if reviewers will provide the information and

criticism.

(9)

RC/12Dec8S/ 2

C. WHAT DO THESE FIGURES REPRESENT? The data presented are

from the several agencies. References are given to specific sources

and documents and Mhere possible to page locations. Adjustments Mere

made to data for conversion into a common format — RVOs, and into the common context of either Gunnison County or the Gunnison Country

consisting of the Upper Gunnison River Basin. For comparison Mith projections, reported levels of activity (expressed as RVDs) in

selected years are also given. While the projections of some

agencies extend beyond the year 2000, this date provides a useful

interval of fifteen years and was selected for the presentation. Over this time span some agencies expect growth in recreation activities

while others expect there to be no change from the present. It must

be remembered that these figures are only estimates, some of which were made a few years ago, and as such they are subject to change and

to changes in their underlying assumptions.

D. WHAT ARE SOME TENTATIVE CONCLUSIONS? The total amount of RVDs

expected is large. The figures are presented in thousands of RVDs;

but each RVD represents one or more people on the. ground here within

this area doing something for 12 hours. The figures indicate an

expected visitor population on the ground on an average seasonal day

of about—one half the Gunnison Area's permanent population. There are and will be marked fluctuations in the number of visitors on the

ground within seasons and between seasons. But, while faces may change the expected visitors also represent a kind of permanent

population whose numbers are expected to increase and whose needs must be met. Over the span of years, expected growth in recreational

activity also implies growth of our "usual" permanent population — a

growth of some 50X to perhaps more than 100% from the pre^bnt.

Comparisons between reported and projected figures show the need to re—examine and update some assumptions underlying projections made several years ago. Periodic study of the differences between

experience and expectations provides a better understanding of events and better preparation for the future.

E. WHAT HAPPENS NOW? The gathered information will be used for

planning decisions. Reviewers should examine the material relevauit to their concerns and identify needed corrections, omissions,

additions, updates, and other improvements. The obvious gaps rec^ire filling so please identify sources and information.

The focus has been upon recreation using public resources and

facilities. The next step is to pull together information about

recreational use of private resources and facilities. A connection between the two sectors is through accommodations — where do the people stay who do what they do.

Soon information will be developed on where, within the Gunnison area, various activities are occurring and related problems — too much use, too little, conflicts, etc. The objective is to use our

combination of private and public resources wisely, to respond wisely to the requirements and implications of the tourist industry, and to be aware of its changing nature.

Please call Pam Park, at the Planning Department in the Gunnison County Courthouse (641-0360), with your comments.

(10)

t 1 11 I 11 C II I II E II F II t II N 11 I tl J II lISUNNISn MEA RECREATItti FORECASTS Irift IT/AOk/BS - I. nark ZHilt: |ar«- SECTION I — REFORTEI AND ESTIRATEI ACTIVITY

31 Fiiurn in thwsandi of RKroation Visitor kyi — NRVOs (1 RVD • 12 kours of activityl 41 Arts is Bunnisofl County.

5!

AlFoTKt Strvice: (Rof. FSRI84/1B-Ifl

7! (projoctions adj. to E.C.'s Z of lfB3 rcpt. total activity.

B! EC X of FS Tot.

VI Devoloped Recrcitioa 47.2 iOI Dowihill Skiinp SI.B III lisp. Rk. • Hunting A0.7

121 FisAii^ 11,B

131 Other IV.V

141 Off-Road Vthiclo 27.V

131 Bildtrness 2V.7

III

171 Total Forest Service (in RRVl's)

IBI

IVIHatiooal Park Service (Ref. CENP7V/32-3VI CSMd/lO; pcoo-iBOctBS) 201 Eiven Total Eipressed in Activity lays

211 Z of total activity: projected and reported RVI Adj.

221 in IVBl in 1984 Factor

231 Sightseeing (see Other) 44.OZ 44.4Z 47.3Z .03 241 Picnicking S.OZ B.BZ 4.VZ .17

231 Caaping 2C.0Z 10.3Z lO.OZ 1.0} 201 Nater-skiing I.OZ .7Z .2Z .33

271 Boating i2.0Z I2.7Z 7.0Z .33 20! Fishing iB.OZ 20.5Z I0.2Z .33 291 Hunting .2Z .IZ .33 301 Cross-Country Skiing .0 .33 31! Snouaohiling .0 .17 321 Suisaing .31 .19

331 Other (in 1984 estiaated at 20. .4Z 20.0Z .17 341 Total of Z - lOO.OZ lOO.OZ lOO.OZ 331 Total Nat. Park SKvice (in HRVl's)

Reported in Year: 308.3 272.1 71.8 132.0 220.0 219.0 33.A 29.7 38.7 30.4 121.2 114.8 3A.i 28.0 898.2 852.0 990.0 1030.2 993.3 30.7 44.9 33.0 14.8 11.0 8.3 102.0 103.0 99.4 2.3 .7 .3 41.0 42.2 23.0 07.0 39.7 33.4 .7 .3 .3 .0 .1 .0 .1 .0 .0 .7 .7 .0 203.1 204.4 219.2

37IBureau of Land Hanageoent (Ref. Conversation! 38! Eiven as preliainary estinate of RVI's

391

40! Developed Recreation

41! lisp. Rec. - Hunting 42! Fishing

43! Other

44! Off-Road Vehicle

43! Priaitive Areas (oildemess) 40!

47! Total Bureau of Land Nanagenent (in HRVD'sl

for year 1984 Lake City 70 3 3 30 70 30 3 2 145 3 2.3 2.3 111 /T 49!Divisian of Hildlife (Ref. VDEB4/2, FKPE/gun, and g84/gun)

30! Eiven as Nan Days and Hildlife Fishing User Days for E.C.

Si! RVD Adj. -'actor

52! Fishing (1980 in Nan-Days) 741.8 .41 S3! Hunting (1983 in HFUD's) - Deer 33.1 1.4

34! Elk 80.3 1.4

33! Non-Consuap. Hildlife 133 .2 301

37! Total Division of Hildlife (in NRVD's) 56!

SViPrivate Sector - RKreational Activity On Private Land 00! DOH less activity on pnhlic land

01! Hunting 021 Fishing

03!

04! (Other inforoation added as available)

03! Total of Activity on Private Land

TOTAL RECREATIONAL ACTIVITY IN EUNNISON COUNTY AREA (in NRVD's)

(11)

i II I! I ti 0 II r It Q II I II I It T tl H 11 V I

It fl|t 2/i

21 SECTIOH II — PMUECra FUTURE RCTIvm

II lor fttoflifon Coiaty irti ii yiv:

41

SI 1980 1981 1982 1983 1914 198S 1988 1987 1988 1189 41

Bii FS projKtiont iitind to tho ytor 2030.

272.8 274.S IIS.O 121.1 100.2 100.3 28.7 29.3 143.8 144.9 44.9 47.4 48.7 49.4 774.0 791.3 280.2 283.9 127.2 133.3 lOO.S 100.4 29.9 30.4 149.9 173(0 48.4 49.2 30.5 . S1.4 / 804.S 821.8 291.2 298.4 139.3 149.) 100.8 100.9 31.0 31.3 174.1 181.8 49.9 51.2 32.3 33.3 304.0 313.3 138.4 148.2 101.0 101.1 32.0 32.3 187.4 193.3 32.3 33.8 34.4 S3.S 840.7 844.4 892.0 917.7 1034.3 1130.0 1203.4 1281.1 1354.4 1432.2 1307.7 1383.3 1438.8

(note: iliovt ligurcs ere pivte ii totil ictivity ityt end convKted belon to RVB'i

according to pcrcintagt diitribotion of activity cipcriMctd in 1984)

231 39.9 42.7 43.4 48.4 31.3 34.2 37.0 59.9 42.7 45.4 24! 8.8 9.4 10.1 10.7 11.3 12.0 12.4 13.2 13.9 14.5 23! 103.3 112.8 120.4 127.9 133.3 143.0 130.4 158.1 143.4 173.2 24! .3 .4 .4 .7 .7 .7 .8 .6 .9 .9 27! 24.3 24.1 27.8 29.4 31.3 33.0 34.8 34.5 38.3 40.0 281 33.3 37.9 40.4 42.9 43.3 48.0 30.3 53.1 35.4 38.1 29! .3 .3 .3 .4 .4 .4 .4 .4 .5 .5 30! .2 .2 .2 .2 .2 .2 .2 .2 .2 .3 31! .1 .1 .1 .1 .1 .1 .1 .1 .1 .1 32! .4 .7 .7 .8 .8 .8 .9 .9 1.0 1.0 33! 33.9 38.4 41.0 43.4 44.1 48.7 31.3 53.9 54.4 59.0 34! 33! 231.2 249.2 287.2 303.2 323.2 341.2 359.2 377.2 393.2 413.2

Ro tajor ckangea projKted by BUI for activitiei over years.

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 5.0 30.0 30.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.8 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.( 2.0 2.0 2.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 5.0 3.0 3.0 3.8 3.0 3.0 5.0 2.5 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 94.5 94.3 94.5 94.3 94.3 94.3 94.3 94.5 94.5 94.5

No eajor changtt projKted by MM for activities ovk years.

304.1 49.1 112.7 24.4 304.1 49.1 112.7 24.4 304.1 49.1 112.7 24.4 304.1 49.1 112.7 24.4 304.1 49.1 112.7 24.4 304.1 49.1 112.7 24.4 304.1 49.1 112.7 24.4 304.1 49.1 112.7 24.4 304.1 49.1 112.7 24.4 304.1 49.1 112.7 24.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 11.4 207.4 11.2 204.3 11.0 201.3 10.9 198.2 10.7 193.1 10.5 192.1 10.4 189.1 10.3 184.1 10.1 183.1 219.0 215.7 212.4 209.1 205.8 202.4 199.5 194.3 193.2 1333.7 1388.4 1418.4 1448.3 1482.2 1322.7 1343.2 1403.7 1444.3

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II X It r II Z II M II M II AC II M II «E II IF II M I

SECTIO* n — PRWECTBI FUTURE ACTIVITY

For SunaisM Couaty «rti la yiir:

l»W 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1991 1997 1998 1999 2000

328.0 332.0 335.9 339.8 343.7 347.1 351.5 355.5 359.4 3iS.3 317.2 187. S 194.8 202.0 209.3 211.5 223.8 231.0 238.3 245.5 252.8 260.0 101.4 101.S 101.1 101.7 101.9 102.0 102.1 102.2 102.3 102.5 102.6 33.4 33.1 33.9 34.1 34.4 34.1 34.9 35.1 35.4 35.1 35.9 204.8 209.2 213.7 218.2 222.7 227.2 231.i 23i.l 240.i 245.1 249.5 SI. 4 57.3 56.3 59.2 10.2 il.l 12.0 13.0 13.9 14.9 65.8 S7.I 58.5 59.3 10.2 il.l il.9 12.8

■f 13. i 14.5 15.4 66.2 V49.1 981.9 1004.7 1022.5 1040.4 1058.2 1071.0 1093.8 1111.7 1129.5 1147.3 1809.9 1885.4 1935.9 1981.4 2031.9 2087.4 2138.0 2188.5 2239.0 2289.5 2340.0 18.4 71.3 73.2 75.1 77.0 78.9 80.8 82.8 84.7 8i.i 88.5 15.1 15.8 11.2 li.l 17.0 17.4 17.9 18.3 18.7 19.1 19.6 180.7 188.3 193.3 198.4 203.4 208.5 213.5 218.5 223.1 228.i 233.7 .9 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.2 41.7 43.5 44.7 45.8 47.0 48.2 49.3 50.5 51.i 52.8 54.0 10.7 13.2 14.9 il.l 18.3 70.0 71.7 73.3 75.0 71.7 78.4 .5 .5 .5 .5 .1 .i .i .i .i ■i .6 .3 .3 .3 .3 .3 .3 .3 .3 .3 .3 .3 .1 .1 .1 .1 .1 .1 .1 .2 .2 .2 .2 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.4 il.l 14.1 15.9 17.1 19.3 71.0 72.7 74.4 71.2 77.9 79.6 431.2 449.2 411.2 473.2 485.3 497.3 509.3 521.4 533.4 545.4 557.5 361 371 • 381 391 40! 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.8 5.0' 411 ■ 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.4 50.0 42! 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 431 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 441 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 451 461 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 471 94.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 481 \ 491 50! 511 521 304.1 304.1 304.1 304.1 304.1 304.1 304.1 304.1 304.1 304.1 304.1 531 49.1 49.1 49.1 49.1 49.1 49.1 49.1 49.1 49.1 49.1 49.1 54! 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 SI 26.6 26.6 26.6 26.6 26.6 26.6 26.6 26.6 26.6 26.6 26.6 561 571 S8! 492.6 492.6 492.6 492.6 492.6 492.6 492.6 492.6 492.6 492.6 492.6 dDO 591 601 ill 10.0 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.0 8.9 8.7 8.6 621 180.1 177.3 175.4 173.4 171.5 169.5 167.6 165.7 163.7 161.8 159.8 631 641 651 190.1 187.1 185.1 183.0 180.9 178.8 176.8 174.7 172.6 170.5 168.5 661 671 681 691 1684.8 1717.7 1745.5 1773.3 1801.0 1828.8 1856.6 1E84.4 1912.2 1940.0 1967.8

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t « tl I II C :: D !! E !l F II B

731

7ii SECTION III — VISITOR RCCOHIIOSATIDN CAPACm (Pkmm <t on> tiM in NRVOil )

77! PUBLIC SECTOR — *r«j is ttif Eunnison Count'y

7BI 7VI

iOIFwMt Service IRef. FSROES2/cSOOO-UOO)

Bll Cupgrovnds Sites In Eunnison Arei

B2I Sites - S POATs per site! 1 POAT • IRVI

631 Planned additions (Rel. FSRI84/20-21I

84! Total HRVD capacity Tor one day ol seasoo

831 Total Seasonal Capacity in RRVO's • days in season are 841 Reported and projKted use oT caipprounds in NRVs 671 as percentage of reported Developed Rec. - Roe f 681 Percentage of available capacity etilized

Dispersed / Nilderness Caeping

VSINational Park Service (Ref. C6IIP7T/MI C8IIP80/7i-77)

V4I Caapgroonds Sites

93! Sites - 4 POATs pK site; I POAT » I RVD 941 Planned additions (Ref. CRIi2-83/2-3l

971 Total HRVD capacity for one day of season

981 Total Seasonal Capacity in HRVDs - days in season are 99! Reported and Projected Use in HRVs - ron 23

1001 Percentage of available capacity utilized I03!Bureau of Land Hanageeent (Ref. Eunnison Basin Rapl 104! Canpground Sites

103! Sites - 3 POATs per site! 1 POAT > 1 RVD

104! Planned additions - none

107! Total HRVD capacity for one day of season

108! Total seasonal Capacity in HRVDs - days in season are 109! ■ Rpt'ed and Projected Use in HRVDs - ran 40 a L.C. Area i

110! Percentage of available capacity utilized

111!

1121 Dispersed / Nilde'ness Caeping

115!Public Lands Accoenodation Hatch The difference betueen HRVJs of

114! various sunuK recreational activities and caeping at develooe-i sites.

1171

118! HHAT TKY DO — Total SuMer Recreational Activity less Caiping 119! WERE THEY CAN STAY — Total Developed Caeping Capacity

1201

1211 Total of Dispersed Caeping

122!

1231 PRIVATE SEaOR ICCOHHODATION (outline)

124!

125!*Pillo<i' Capacity - 1 Pillou > 1 RVD 124! Existing facilities (Ref. CoC peon)

1271 Crested Butte Vea 128! Hotel

129! City of Eunnison Area 130! Rest of Eunnison County 131! Lake City Area

132! Renainder of Eunnison Country 133! Planned and proposed additions

134! Blue Hms Highlands Hotel

134!RKreational Vehicle Space - 1 space • i.3 RVDs 137! Blue Hesa Highlands (USPB4)

138! Rec. Vehicle Sites at 1.3 POAT

139!

140!Second Hone / Vacation Residences - 1 Unit ■ 3.3 RVDs

141! Existing

142!

143! Planned and proposed additions 144! Blue Hesa Highlands Residential

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I R II D II P II t II R II S II T II U » I SECTIOR in - PUBLIC SECTOR RCCOmOOftllOR

P<]t 3/R Ttir 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1981 I Reporttd ] r 1987 1988 1989 ProjKtid ] 584 384 584 584 584 584 584 384 584 584 25 3.0 3.8 3.0 411.1 411.1 411.1 2.8 2.9 2.9 2.9 2.9 2.9 2.9 394.2 394.2 394.2 394.2 394.2 394.2 394.2 179.1 281.1 114.9 175.4 249.8 251.3 212.8 45.41 72.7Z 41.81 44.51 13.41 15.01 11.71 i 219.2 275.7 282.2 13.51 17.11 18.11 175 175 175 175 175 175 313 .7 .7 .7 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 105.0 105.0 105.0 292.8 292.8 292.8 292.8 99.0 102.0 93.0 105.0 99.0 143.0 150.1 175 75 175 2.0 2.0 2.0 292.8 292.8 292.8 ISS.l 115.1 173.2 54.01 51.11 59.21 94.31 97.11 88.11 35.91 33.81 48.81 51.41 .2 21.1 .2 .2 21.1 21.1 .2 21.1 .2 .2 21.1 21.1 .2 21.1 .2 .2 .2 21.1 21.1 21.1 22.5 22.5 22.5 104.21 104.21 104.21 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 104.21 104.21 104.21 104.21 104.21 104.21 104.21 1405.1 1419.1 1432.5 1441.0 1410.2 1477.8 520.8 520.8 520.8 708.1 708.1 708.1 1495.4 1513.0 1530.1 708.1 725.5 725.5 300 300 300

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I I II 74i::;;::;::: 751 7i!Yeir 771 IWO 7B! I 771 I 11 Y 11 Z 11 M 11 M II AC !! M I! K It DF II M I

SECTION HI - PUniC SECTOR ACCOmOMTION Fiqc i'o

IWi H?2 1793 1994 1995 1994 1997 1998 1999 2000 — ProjKtid Nl 811 821 584 831 841 3.0 851 411.1 584 584 584 584 584 584 584 584 584 584 40 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.2 411.1 411.1 411.1 438.1 438.1 438.1 438.1 438.1 438.1 438.1 841 871 288.7 292.1 295.4 299.0 302.5 305.9 309.4 312.8 314.3 319.7 323.2 71.11 71.93 72.n 49.03 69.83 70.43 71.43 72.23 73.03 73.83 ■ i 881 70.n 891 901 911 921 931 941 951 175 94! 971 2.0 981 292.8 175 75 175 175 75 175 175 75 175 175 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 292.8 292.8 292.8 292.8 292.8 292.8 292.8 292.8 292.8 292.8 188.3 193.3 198.4 203.4 208.5 213.5 218.5 223.4 228.4 233.7 44.33 44.03 47.73 49.53 71.23 72.93 74.43 74.43 78.13 79.83 99! 180.7 100! 41.73 1011 1021 1031 104! 1051 1041 107! 108! 109! .2 21.4 22.5 .2 .2 .2 .2 .2 .2 .2 .2 .2 .2 21.4 21.4 21.4 21.4 21.4 21.4 21.4 21.4 21.4 21.4 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 104.23 104.23 104.23 104.23 104.23 104.23 104.23 104.23 104.23 104.23 110! 104.23 111! 12! 13! 14! 15! 14! 17! 18! 1548.3 1543.3 1575.7 1588.2 1400.4 1413.0 1425.5 1437.9 1450.3 1442.8 1475.2 725.5 725.5 725.5 725.5 752.5 752.5 752.5 752.5 752.5 752.5 119! 120! 121! 122! 123! 124! 125! 124! 127! 128! 129! 130! 131! 132! 133! 134! 1351 134! 137! 138! 139! 140! 141! 142! 143! 144! 725.5 25 25 25 25 300 300 25 25 25 25 25 25

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i r< n jfjL

f^/^Z/

\ ^ ': s :: c :: d : i e i i f i : IIWNIIIiON COUNir flPEA RrCPEAIION FORECflSIS 0

21 SECTIOH 1 — PEPDRTED AND ESTIRATED ACTIVITY

Jl jur»5 i" 'ho'-'sand* of Recrtation Viiitor Days

AI 'I RVC - 12 ho'jrs o( activity)

D

ilForest 3»rvice; (Ref. fSRI8tMB-19l

71 'r'oipcticti? adj. to S.C.'s I of 1983 ropt. total activity)

B: 6C Z of FS Tot.'

91 CcvEloped Pecreatioi 47.2

101 Ocvnhill 'liitiq 51.B

111 Di;p. Rec. - Huntin; iO.7

121 Fiohino 11.B

131 Otiipr 19.9

Ml Off-R?ad Vehicle 27.9 151 Kildernees 29.7 til

171 Total Forest Service (in RVD'i)

raft 30/Aiip/a5 - R.

7 11 r 1

pa^e 1/3

Reported in Year:

19BI 19B3

191Nationil Part Service (Ref. CBKP79/32-39 and CSKB4'10I

201 Biven Total Erpressed in Activity Days 988.9 1050.2

211 RVD Ad). Factor

221 Z of total for activity in 19811 1983; and proj.

231 Sightseeing 46.4 53.4 44 .16 84.5 89.7 241 Picnicking B.7 6.4 5 .25 15.8 16.8 251 Caeoing 10.3 10 20 1 98.9 105.0 261 Nater-skiing .7 .1 1 .41 .4 .4 271 Boating 12.7 12.1 12 .5 59.8 63.5 2B1 fishing 20.5 17.2 IB .41 69.7 74.1 291 Hunting .2 .09 .0 .0 301 Other 0 .03 .0 .0

321 Total Nat. Far); Service (in RVD's)

331

341!ureau of Land Kanageient (Ref. Conversation)

351 Biven as prelininary estieate of RVD's for B.C. 37! Developed Recreatior

3B1 Disp. Rec. - Hunting 391 Fishing

401 Other

411 Off-Road Vehicle

42! Rriiitive Areas (nilderness) 431

441 Total Bureau of Land Kanageient fin RVD's) 451

4ilDivision of Nildlife (Ref. VDEB4/gun and FRPE/gunl

471 Biven as Kan Davs and Nildlife Fishing User Days for B.C.

4BI RVD/Adj. Factor

491 Fishing I19B0 in Kan-Days) 741.B .41 501 Hunting (!9B3 in HFliD's) - Deer 3B.1 1.4

Sll EU BO.S 1.4 521 Non-Consuip. Nildlife 133 .2 in year 19B4 5 SO 30 2 5 2.5

541 Total Division of Nildlife (in RVt'sl 551

541Frivate Sector - Recreational Activity On Private Land 571 DON less activity on public land

5B1 Hunting

591 Fishing

&01 Other: (to be added if infornation it available] ill

621 Total of Activity on Private Land

TOTAL RECREAflONAL ACTIVITY IN EUNNISW COUNTY AREA (in R9D'il (sun of -S, NPS, BLK, and Private)

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L !! H * :i 0 I! p :i B I! R :i s i: I i: u :

paqt 2/3 SECTION II — PROJECTED FUTURE ACTIVITY

Tor Gunniscn County irti in year:

1980 1781 1982 1983 1984 1985 1984 1987 1988 1989

Ths PS projections entend to the year 2030.

272.8 774.5 280.2 283.9 291.2 298.4 304.0 313.3 320.7 115.0 121.1 127.2 133.3 139.3 149.0 158.4 148.2 177.9 100.2 100.3 100.5 100.4 100.8 100.9 ICl.O 101.1 101.2 . , 28.7 29.3 29.9 30.4 31.0 31.5 12.0 32.5 32.9 f'' 143.8 144.9 149.9 173.0 174.1 181.8 1E7.4 193.3 199.0 44.9 47.4 48.4 49.2 49.9 51.2 52.5 53.8 55.1 48.7 19.4 50.5 51.4 52.3 53.3 54.4 55.5 54.5 774.0 791.3 804.5 821.8 840.7 844.4 892.0 917.7 943.4 1054.5 1130.0 1205.4 1281.I 1354.4 1432.2 1507.7 1583.3 1458.1 (note: above figures are given at total activity days.)

74.2 79.4 84.9 90.2 95.5 100.8 104.1 ii;.5 114.8 122.1 13.2 14.1 15.1 14.0 17.0 17.9 18.8 17.8 20.7 21.7 210.9 224.0 241.1 254.2 271.3 284.4 301.5 3U.7 331.8 344.9 4.3 4.4 4.9 5.3 5.4 5.9 4.2 4.5 4.8 7.1 43.3 47.8 72.3 74.9 81.4 85.9 90.5 95.0 99.5 104.1 77.8 83.4 89.0 94.5 100.1 105.7 111.3 1U.8 122.4 128.0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 443.7 475.5 507.3 539.1 570.9 402.7 434.4 444.2 498.0 729.8

No aajor changes projected by BLR for activities over years.

5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5uO 5.0 5.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 • 50.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.3 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 94 5 94.5 94.5

No aajor changes projected by DON for activities over years.

491 304.1 304.1 304.1 304.1 304.1 304.1 304.1 314.1 304.1 304.1 50! 49.1 49.1 49.1 49.1 49.1 49.1 49.1 49.1 49.1 49.1 511 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 52! 24.4 24.4 24.4 24.4 24.4 24.4 24.4 24.4 24.4 24.4 531 54! 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 55! 54! 57! 58! 11.7 11.5 11.4 11.2 11.1 11.0 10.8 10.7 10.4 591 142.1 155.9 149.7 143.4 137.4 131.4 125J :i9.3 113.2 40! 41! 42! 173.8 147.4 141.1 154.8 148.5 142.3 134.2 130.0 123.8 43! 44! 45! 44! 1519.8 1540.5 1401.2 1441.9 1484.3 1737.4 1788.9 1840.2 1891.5

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V :! U II I 11 7 11 I 11 HA 1 1 A8 1; AC 1: AD II AE 1 1 AF 1 pioe 3/3 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1994 1997 1998 1999 2000 328.0 332.0 335.9 339.8 343.7 347.4 351.5 355.5 359.4 343.3 347.2 187.5 194.8 202.0 209.3 214.5 223.8 231.0 238.3 245.5 252.8 240.0 101.4 101.5 101.4 101.7 101.9 102.0 102.1 102.2 102.3 102.5 102.4 33.4 33.4 33.9 34.1 34.4 34.4 34.9 35.1 35.4 35.4 35.9 204.8 209.2 213.7 218.2 222.7 227.2 231.4 234.1 240.4 245.1 249.5 54.4 57.3 58.3 59.2 40.2 41.1 42.0 43.0 43.9 44.9 45.8 57.4 58.5 il.Z 40.2 41.1 41.9 42.8 43.4 44.5 45.4 44.2 949.1 984.9 1004.7 1022.5 1040.4 1058.2 1074.0 1093.8 1111.7 1129.5 1147.3 1809.9 1885.4 1935.9 1984.4 2034.9 2087.4 2138.0 2188.5 2239.0 2289.5 2340.0 127.4 132.7 134.3 139.8 143.4 147.0 150.5 154.1 157.4 141.2 144.7 22.4 23.4 24.2 24.8 25.5 24.1 24.7 27.4 28.0 28.4 29.3 342.0 377.1 387.2 397.3 407.4 417.5 427.4 437.7 447.8 457.9 448.0 7.4 7.7 7.9 8.1 8.4 8.4 B.B 9.0 9.2 9.4 9.4 108.4 113.1 114.2 119.2 122.2 125.2 128.3 131.3 134.3 137.4 140.4 133.4 139.1 142.9 144.4 150.3 154.1 157.8 141.5 145.2 149.0 172.7 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 741.4 793.4 614.4 835.9 857.1 878.4 899.7 920.9 942.2 943.4 984.7 5.0 5.0 . 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 94.5 304.1 304.1 304.1 304.1 304.1 304.1 304.1 304.1 304.1 304.1 304.1 49.1 49.1 47.1 49.1 49.1 49.1 49.1 49.1 49.1 49.1 49.1 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 112.7 24.4 24.4 24.4 24.4 24.4 24.4 24.4 24.4 24.4 24.4 24.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 492.4 10.5 10.J 10.2 10.1 10.0 9.0 9.7 9.4 9.5 ».4 7.3 107.2 101.4 97.4 93.4 09.4 85.5 01.5 77.5 73.5 49.5 45.4 117.4 111.7 107.4 103.5 99.4 95.3 91.2 87.1 83.0 7B.9 74. 2254.3 23C1.3

(19)

ECONOMIC VALUE OF BENEFITS

FROM RECREATION AT HIGH MOUNTAIN RESERVOIRS

Richard G. Walsh Robert Aukerman Dean Rud December 1978 A"S i» X: m ^:fe£i«ar^sa

m

■z-rsz

f^m

£jrs 3fe

Technical Report No. 14

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ACKNOWLEDGMENT

This brief technical report examines the potential economic value of recreational use of water storage reservoirs located at high elevations on the front range of the Colorado Rocky Mountains. It is made possible by funding support from the Legislative Council which enabled the Colorado Water Resources Research Institute to extend research on the subject already in progress. That work is supported in part by funds provided by the U.S. Department of Interior, Office of Water Research and Technology;

The Colorado State University Experiment Station; and the Colorado Department of Natural Resources.

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SUMMARY REPORT

ECONOMIC VALUE OF BENEFITS FROM RECREATION AT HIGH MOUNTAIN RESERVOIRS

Richard G. Walsh, Professor of Economics Colorado State University

Robert Aukermari, Professor of Recreation Resources Colorado State University

Dean Rud, Graduate Assistant, Economics Colorado State University

Research Sponsored by

The Legislative Council

Colorado General Assembly

January 1979

Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Colorado State University

Fort Collins, Colorado 80523

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ECONOMIC VALUE OF BENEFITS FROM RECREATION

AT HIGH MOUNTAIN RESERVOIRS

Richard G. Walsh, Robert Aukerman, and Dean Rud—

Rapid population growth along the Front Range of Colorado exerts

increased pressure on the state's natural resources, degrading exist

ing water recreation areas and diminishing the value of water recreation

activities. Economic information is needed to assess the feasibility

of expanding recreation opportunities on high mountain reservoirs which are now closed to public use. Until recently, more than 100 reservoirs were closed, with 3,500 surface acres representing AO percent of the total surface area of reservoirs at 6,000 to 11,000 feet elevation on the Front Range of Colorado (Auckerman, Springer

and Judge, 1977). In the future, these small reservoirs of 10 to

AOO acres in size may be able to satisfy uses for water-based

recreation while continuing to serve other uses, such as storage for

irrigation and domestic water supply.

The recreation benefits found in this study can be compared to the costs of developing and managing recreation facilities along with legal, environmental and institutional considerations to assess the feasibility of expanding recreation opportunities on high mountain

reservoirs. Results may be useful to the state legislature when it makes appropriation decisions, such as whether to lease or buy access

and minimum pools in high mountain reservoirs. Results may be useful

Dr. Walsh is Professor of Economics, Dr. Aukerman is Associate

Professor of Recreation Resources and Mr. Rud is a graduate research

assistant in the Department of Economics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins.

(23)

to state and local agencies having responsibility for water resource management under existing legislation. Ditch and reservoir owners may find the information useful in deciding whether to open reser voirs for public use.

Research Procedure

This study developed and applied a procedure for measuring recreation benefits of high mountain reservoirs. Two hundred people

were interviewed at 12 high mountain reservoir sites on the Front Range of Colorado during the summer of 1978. The 12 study sites

represented the range in size from 10 to 400 acres and other character istics such as road or trail access and facilities, typical of

reservoirs located at 6,000 to 11,000 feet elevation along the Front

Range of Colorado. For comparison, 40 boaters were interviewed at

two reservoirs located in the foothills of the Front Range at 5,000 to 6,000 feet elevation. Study sites are shown on Figure 1 and their characteristics in Table 1.

Each recreation participant was asked for an estimate of his

or her direct out-of-pocket costs in making the trip. Direct costs associated with the activities were identified easily. This was

followed by a surplus value question, which asked respondents to consider the maximum worth of their recreation experience, defined as the increase in total trip expenses above which they would decide not to participate, given water level and crowding level as they existed on the day of the interview.

(24)

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Figure 1 . Location of the Study Sites, High Mountain

(25)

Table I . Number of Persons Interviewed, Size, Storage Capacity, Shoreline Mi les, and Annual

Recreation Use, 12 High Mountain Reservoirs, Colorado, 1978.

Recreation Site

High Mountain Reservoirs

Smal1, 1-50 acres Bear Tracks Lake Blue Lake Brainaird Lake Lake Isabelle Zimmerman Lake Medium, 51"150 acres Dowdy Lake Jefferson Lake Lefthand Reservoir Parvin Lake Skagway Reservoir Large, 151-^00 acres Barker Reservoir "Chambers Lake Lake Estes Tarryal1 Reservoir Low Mountain Reservoirs Over 400 acres Carter Lake —Horsetooth Reservoir Number of Interviews Surface Acres Storage Capacity, Acre Feet Shorel i ne Mi les Annual Number of User Days, 1976 1.899 n,222 1 ,720 1 ,534 900 3,678 12,125 8,824 3,000 13,135 133,500 143,500 266,995 214,730

(26)

Maximum reservoir water level was determined by clearly ob

served water lines showing maximum bankful conditions. Interviewers estimated, in percentage terms, how water level the day of the

interview compared to maximum bankful conditions. Then, respondents

were asked to estimate how their participation and value would change

with changes in the current water level to five threshold levels:

100, 75, 50, 25 and zero percent of maximum bankful. Thus, respondents

were asked to consider each of these water levels as unique recreation

resources, with the expectation that each would have a distinct demand.

Types of Recreation Activities

Table 2 shows the types of recreation activities at high moun

tain reservoirs. The primary activity during the summer of 1978 was fishing, which accounted for two-thirds of total time at the

reservoir sites. This was particularly true for medium-sized and large-sized reservoirs with road access. Fishing accounted for 36

percent of total time at small reservoirs with trail access only. Fishermen reported that 7.2 percent of their time at the study sites was devoted to recreation vehicle camping and 6.9 percent to tent camping. On large-sized reservoirs, RV camping was more important where it accounted for 11.5 percent of total time. Tent camping was more important on small walk-in reservoirs where it accounted for

18.2 percent of total time. Backpacking was also an important activity

*

at small reservoirs where it accounted for 17.9 percent of total time. Hiking accounted for 8.1 percent of total time at small reservoirs but represented only about 3 percent of total time at all high mountain reservoirs. Inactivity accounted for 5.4 percent of the

(27)

Table 2 . Types of Recreation Activities Reported at High Mountain Reservoirs, Colorado, 1978.

Recreation Site Sample SI ze Camp ing (RV) Camp-1 ng (Tent) Flsh-1 ng Hiking Back-pack ing . Slght-see1ng PIcnlck-1 ng Swim-mi ng Canoe ing, Raft ing Off-Road Vehicle Reiax-1 ng Photo graphy Hunt-i ng Power Boat -i ng Sal 1-Boat ing I Other - - - - • .. .. - .

- - Percent of Time at This Site - - - ■ .. ,

- - -..

-High Mountain Reservoirs

Smal1, 1-50 acres 37 2.11 18.16 36.2't 8.05 17.89 1.89 .27 .27 0.00 .61 5.68 5.35 1.08 0.00 0.00 2.30 Medium, 51-150 acres 101 6.5'i 5.50 76.61. 1.83 .15 1.29 .50 .35 .80 0.00 5.15 .65 0.00 .50 .30 0.00

Large, 151-'•00 acres 62 11.115 2.50 69.'.6 1.69 1.21 1.58 2.15 0.00 .57 0.00 5.55 .68 0.00 2.58 .81 0.00

TOTAL 200 7.2'. 6.91 66.83 2.9'. 3.79 1.69 .97 .23 .58 .08 5.37 1.36 .20 1.05 .60 .63

Low Mountain Reservoirs

(28)

total time at high mountain reservoirs. Photography accounted for

about 5.4 percent of the total time at small high mountain reser voirs but accounted for one-tenth that (0.5 percent) on medium-sized and large-sized reservoirs. Power boating was limited to large high mountain reservoirs where it accounted for only 2.6 percent of total time. Sailing, canoeing and rafting were unimportant, account ing for about 0.5 percent of total time. Sightseeing accounted for

1.5 percent of the time at study sites, but driving off-road vehicles accounted for less than 0.1 percent of total time. Picnicking was important at the larger reservoirs where it accounted for 2.2 percent

of total time.

Economic Value of Recreation Benefits

Table 3 shows that the value per day of recreation at high mountain reservoirs would increase by $0.34 for each 1 percent increase in water level and peak at $34 with 100 percent bankful.

Participation in recreation activities at the study sites would

increase by .067 days per participant for each 1 percent increase

in water level and peak at 6.65 days annually with 100 percent bankful.

Table 4 shows that the average price of recreation at high

mountain reservoirs was $15 per day. This is the direct out-of-pocket cost of round trip mileage of 326 miles, equivalent to 4.6 cents

per mile. This was considerably less than the price of fishing on

West Slope streams where the average price was $25 per day in 1978 (Walsh, Ericson and Arosteguy, 1978). It is comparable to the average

(29)

Table 3 • Effect of Water Level on Will ingness to Pay to Participate in

Recreation Activities at High Mountain Reservoirs, Colorado, 1978.

Recreation Site Samp 1 e

S i ze

Percent of Maximum Bankful Water

100 75 50 25

Level

00

- - - Dol 1ars per Day - - .- _ .

High Mountain Reservoirs

Smal1, 1"50 acres 37 $33.54 $35.05 $22.24 $9.46 $1.54

Medium, 51"150 acres 101 27.61 22.59 12.47 2.54 .16

Large, 151-^00 acres 62 44.83 38.88 29.37 7.98 .03

TOTAL 200 34.05 29.95 19.52 5.51 .19

Low Mountain Reservoirs

(30)

mi I innLWWHic.

Table ^ . Mi les Traveled, Direct Cost per Trip and Per Day at Site, with Consumer Surplus per

Day of Participation in Recreation Activities at High Mountain Reservoirs, Colorado, i97o.

Recreat ion Si te

High Mountain Reservoirs

Sample Size Average One-Way Mi les Traveled on This Trip

Average Direct

Out-of-Pocket Cost for This Trip Total Cost of Trip Cost Per Day Average Consumer Surplus Above Trip Cost per Day Average Total Wi 1 1 i ng-ness to Pay per Day

Smal1, 1-50 acres 37 zs^.ok $56.35 $14.85 $17.34 $32.19 2.17

Medium, 51-150 acres 101 1'»5.68 28.98 14.05 10.60 24.65 1.75

Large, 151-^00 acres 62 136.15 I43.9B 17.14 20.73 37.87 2.21

TOTAL 200 162.77 38.69 15.16 14.99 30.15 1.99

Low Mountain Reservoirs

(31)

in 1973, with inflation averaging about 10 percent annually over the past five years (Ross, Blood and Nobe, 1975).

Total benefits include both the price actually paid plus willingness to pay, which is the area under the demand curve for the activity. This consumer surplus of fishing at high mountain

reservoirs averaged $15 per day. When added to direct costs of

$15 per day, total benefits were $30 per day. The consumer benefit/ cost ratio for fishing at high mountain reservoirs was 2.0 (= $30/$15) compared to stream fishing with a ratio of 1.6 (= $40/$25). Boating on low mountain reservoirs was more expensive with a B/C ratio of 1.4 (= $53/$37). These B/C ratios were calculated with total benefits as the numerator and direct trip cost as the denominator.

Optimum Capacity of Reservoir Recreation

Indications are that high mountain reservoirs are used to capacity. Reserve recreation capacity of only about one person per

activity day existed at the study sites in the summer of 1978. Table 5 shows this as the difference between optimum number of encounters (An encounter was defined as one person within 50 yards of the respondent.) calculated as 15.0 persons and the 13.9 persons encountered on the day of the interview. Optimum capacity was

defined as the number of parties encountered which would maximize

the total value of recreation activity on the reservoir. This occurs at the point where the added costs of congestion to existing users just equals the benefits gained by the additional user. This was

(32)

Table 5 . Hours on the Reservoir and Number of Other Parties Encountered Per Activity Day, With

Optimum Capacity for Maximum Total Value, the Number Preferred for Maximum Enjoyment, and the Maximum Number Tolerated Before Discontinuing Participation in Recreation

Activities at High Mountain Reservoirs, Colorado, 1978.

Recreation Site

Number of Other Parties Encountered Per Activity

High Mountain Reservoirs Smal1, 1-50 acres Medium, 51"150 acres Large, 151-^00 acres TOTAL Sample S i ze Hours on Reservo i r Per Act i V i ty Day The Day of I nterv i ew 15.93 li».19 13.92

Day at this Site

Most Preferred Maximum Tol- Optimum For Maximum erated Before Capacity for Enjoyment of Discontinuing Maximum Total

Act i vi ty Activit Va .1 ue 3.36 1 .Ik 12.13 8.OA 17.11 28.39 31 .37 27.23

Low Mountain Reservoirs Over AOO acres

(33)

Table 6 . Effect of Number of Other Parties Encountered Per Activity Day on Wi ll ingness to Pay to Participate In Recreation Actlvltes at High Mountain Reservoirs, Colorado, 1978.

Recreation Site

High Mountain Reservoirs

Smal1 , 1-50 acres Medium, 51-150 acres

Large, 15l-'iOO acres

Sample Size

Number of Other Parties Encountered per Act i vIty ~'l'5 I 20 I 25 "I 30 r~ 35 r '<0~T - - - Dollars per Day

-$1)8.82 $1)0.0') $29.73 $11.79 0 0 0 35.98 33.'i't 29.08 23.39 $17.70 $7.75 0 56.51) 55.06 52.29 117.93 110.78 28.72 $6.30 1)1).73 1)1.87 39.50 35.07 21).1)9 7.78 0

Low Mountain Reservoirs

(34)

Reservoir users reported they would prefer to encounter 8.0

persons on the reservoir during an activity day, or 5.9 persons

fewer than the 13.9 persons encountered on the day of the interview. The maximum number they would tolerate before discontinuing the activity was 27.2 persons. Optimum carrying capacity which would maximize the total value of the recreation activity at the reservoirs was calculated as 15 persons per day, or nearly double the most

preferred number of encounters. However, optimum carrying capacity

was about one-half of the maximum number of encounters users would

tolerate before discontinuing the activity at the study sites.

Characteristics of Recreation Users

Table 7 shows some of the characteristics of participants in

recreation activities at high mountain reservoirs. Average annual income was reported as about $19,000, compared to average income of households in the state of $13,600 in 1976, the latest year available. This finding is consistent with other studies of outdoor recreation

which show that participants tend to be in the middle and

upper-middle income groups. Fishermen at high mountain reservoirs have considerably less income than fishermen on West Slope streams, who reported average incomes of $26,000 (Walsh, Ericson and Arosteguy, 1978). Average incomes of fishermen at high mountain reservoirs

were identical to boaters on low mountain reservoirs. Recreation

users of high mountain reservoirs with trail access only had average

incomes of $21,600, or slightly more than users of high mountain

(35)

Table 7 . Socioeconomic Characteristics, Income, Education, Age, Sex and Number of Years

Participated in Primary Recreation Activity at High Mountain Reservoirs,

Colorado, 1978. Recreation Site Sampl e S i ze Average 1ncome Average Years of Educat i on Average Age of Respondent Average Age of Head of Household . _ 1 Percent Mai e Years Part i ci pated in Primary Act i vi ty

High Mountain Reservoirs

Smal1, 1-50 acres Medium, 51"150 acres

Large, ISI-'iOO acres

TOTAL 37 101 62 200 $21,568 17,158 20,258 18,935 1'».95 13.27 12.61 13.38 31.19 k] .01 147.21 l4l .12 31.87 I4I4.88 148.142 I43.57 89^ 86^ &G% I3.AI 18.93 25.I48 19.9i»

Low Mountain Reservoirs

(36)

Average number of years education was reported as 13.4 years,

which was one year more than the average education of the adult population of the state reported as 12.^ years. This finding is

consistent with national surveys of outdoor recreation which show that participants tend to be somewhat more educated than the national

average. Boaters at law mountain reservoirs reported one-half year

more education than fishermen at high mountain reservoirs.

The average age of participants in recreation activities at high

mountain reservoirs was 41.1 years, only slightly less than the average age of adults in the U.S. of 41.5 years. Recreation users of high mountain reseir/oirs with trail access only averaged 31.2 years of age, or 10 years less than users of all mountain reservoirs. which have road access for the most part,

Fishermen on high mountain reservoirs reported 20 years'

experience in the activity, compared to only eight years for boaters on low mountain reservoirs. This fishing and boating experience of

reservoir users was consistent with that of stream users on the

West Slope where fishermen reported 22 years' experience compared to six years for kayakers and five years for rafters.

Alternative Management Practices

Table 8 shows the effect of alternative management practices on the value of recreation at high mountain reservoirs. Toilet facilities, campsites, picnic tables and fire rings contributed to

the value of recreation at medium-sized and large-sized reservoirs

(37)

Table 8 . Effect of Alternative Management Practices on Will ingness to Pay to Participate in Recreation Activities at High Mountain Reservoirs, Colorado, 1978.

Alternate Management Pract i ces

Average Total Wil lingness to Pay per Day

Reservoir Water Dirty, Pol 1uted

User Fee Imposed of $2 per Day or $10 per Year

Sanitation Facil ities Did Not Exist

Road Access Poor

Hike Trail Only Access

to Reservoir (1+ mi le) No Off-Road Vehicles A1lowed No Motor Boats A1lowed No Campsites, Picnic Tables or Fi re Rings Shorel ine Too Steep

and Rocky

Reservoir Not Stocked Well With Fish No Swimming

A1lowed

High Mountain Reservoi rs

Low Mountain Reservoi rs Sma1 1 , 0-50 acres Med i urn, 51-150 acres Large, 151"^00 acres TOTAL $32.19 $2^.65 $37.87 $30.15 $52.92 10.03 6.57 8.56 7.83 31 .05 17.28 17.50 19.6't 18.11 49.46 31 .\k 18.61 19.79 21 .29 39.12 32.99 19.21 30.0^1 25.12 19.41 32.62 19.'♦6 1.6.64 21 .02 1.14 3^.^9 29.7^ 44.73 35.27 49.42 35.26 29.^9 42.52 34.60 6.54 3^.2i» 17.93 20.67 21.79 22.73 25.59 13.82 17.50 17.14 9.24 21 .65 8.13 10.94 11.50 35.75 3^.55 29.22 42.36 34.28 30.10

(38)

but were unimportant to users of small reservoirs. The quality of

the access road also contributed to the value of recreation at

medium-sized and large-sized reservoirs but was unimportant to users

of small reservoirs. If hiking trails were the only access to reservoir recreation, the value of recreation at medium-sized, and in particular large-sized reservoirs, would be reduced substantially,

but values to users of small reservoirs would be unaffected.

Fish stocking programs make a substantial contribution to the

value of recreation at high mountain reservoirs. The same can be said for regulations which prohibit the use of motor boats and

swimming. Prohibition of off-road vehicles also contributes to the

value of recreation at high mountain reservoirs. Imposing a recreation fee of $2 per day or $10 per year would substantially

reduce the value of recreation at high mountain reservoirs by considerably more than the out-of-pocket costs to the user.

Quality of the environment contributes to the value of recreation

at high mountain reservoirs. A steep and rocky shoreline reduces

recreation values by a substantial amount. Dirty or polluted water

(39)

CITATIONS

Aukerman, Robert, William T. Springer and James F. Judge, Inventory

of Colorado's Front Range Mountain Reservoirs. Information Series

No. 23, Environmental Resources Center, Colorado State University

Fort Collins, May 1977. '

Ross, Lee Ann, Dwight M. Blood and Kenneth C. Nobe, A Survey of Sportsmen Expenditures for Hunting and Fishing in Colorado.

1973, Natural Resource Economics No. 20, Department of Economics,

Colorado State University, Fort Collins, April 1975.

Walsh, Richard G., Ray K. Ericson and Daniel J. Arosteguy, An

Empirical Application of a Model for Estimating the Re^eation

Value of Instream Flow. Completion Report No.

, Environmental

Resources Center, Colorado State University, Fort Collins,

(40)

ECONOMIC BENEFITS /^ND COSTS OF THE

FISH STOCKING PROGRAM AT BLUE MESA RESERVOIR, COLORADO

Donn M, Johnson and Richard G. Walsh

Final Report to

Division of WlldlIfe State of Colorado

6060 Broadway Denver, Colorado 80216

Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics Colorado State University

Fort Collins, CO 80523

(41)

ECONOMIC BENEFITS /^ND COSTS OF THE

FISH STOCKING PROGRAM AT BLUE MESA RESERVOIR, COLORADO

Donn M. Johnson and Richard G. Walsh

INTRODUCTION

Recreation fishing at Blue Mesa Reservoir 1s a product of the cooperation

of many government agencies. Including the Bureau of Reclamation, the National

Park Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The U.S. Fish and

Wildlife Service conducts a fish stocking program as part of the Clear Canyon

Project fuh hatchery at a cost of approximately $57,500 per year to produce

fish to stock Blue Mesa Reservoir for the Bureau of Reclamation. In addition,

the Colorado Wildlife Division administers recreation fishing at Blue Mesa

under the state licensing procram, and conducts a stocking program at a cost of

approximately $250,000 per year.

Managers of the agencies Involved are Interested In Improving efficiency

of government operations. In particular, cost effectiveness of the fish

stocking program at the reservoir. The program was Initiated under Section 0

of the Colorado River Project Act of 1956 (Public Law 485, 70 Stat. 105) which

established federal responsibilities for stocking. The Bureau of Reclamation

administers Section 8 funding for the development and operation of recreation,

fish, and wildlife facilities. Funding Is provided to mitigate losses of and

Improve conditions for the propagation of fish and wildlife.

This study

responds to the question; What are the benefits and costs of the fish stocking

program?

STUDY SITE

The study was conducted at Blue Mesa Reservoir, one of three reservoirs,

which also Include Morrow Point and Crystal, that constitute the Curecanti

National Recreation area with over 1.1 million visitors per year. Blue Mesa

(42)

was completed 1n 1965, Morrow Point in 1968, and Crystal In 1977 along a

40-mile stretch of the Gunnison River a short distance from the Gunnison National

Monument. Blue Mesa's primary functions are flood control, water storage, and

power production.

At maximum capacity it is 20 miles in length, has a

shoreline of 96 miles, a storage capacity of 1 million acre feet of water with

a surface area of 9,000 acres.

Fishing is good for rainbow trout, kokanee salmon, brown trout, and lake

trout. The area has two of Colorado's better known trout streams—the Gunnison

River and the Lake Fork, a stream feeding into the south side of Blue Mesa.

There are three major campgrounds and several smaller ones around the

reservoir. Boating, water skiing, sailing, windsurfing, hiking, and horseback trails are available. In addition, boating tours are conducted on Morrow Point

Lake, which offer spectacular scenery in deep canyon settings.

Indications are that the catch rate for rainbow trout is highly correlated with the stocking rate for the same species. The evidence is that at least 90 percent and probably 95 percent or more of the rainbow trout caught

in Blue Mesa are stocked fish. This means that a 10 percent decrease in

stocking rate would possibly result in a 9 percent decrease in catch rate. Wiltzius (1978) found that 92 percent of the creel census in 1975 were

flourescent-marked rainbow trout from 1974 stockers. Since unmarked rainbow

trout have been stocked in the main river above the reservoir each year and in other tributories, it seems likely that most of the unmarked catch were also stocked fish. Consequently, it is apparent that naturally reproduced rainbow

trout contributed little if anything to the Blue Mesa fishery. Other species

may have different stocking requirements to maintain a viable fishery. The kokanee salmon fishing is maintained by stocking, while small brown trout and

(43)

STUDY DESIGN

The data used in this study were obtained from on-site interviews by

sampling 200 fishermen at the reservoir. Interviews were conducted on random days throughout the summer of 1986. Interviewing was initiated at the

beginning of the day with the first person encountered at the study sites.

Subsequent interviews were conducted with persons randomly selected throughout the day. The interviewer was identified as an employee of Colorado State

University to establish the legitimate scientific purpose of the study. Of those approached only 2 persons refused to participate in the survey (thus

sample bias should be insignificant).

The value questions were designed to be as realistic and credible as

possible. Respondents were first asked to report the direct costs of their

current trip. Then, they were asked to estimate the maximum amount they would

be willing to pay rather than forego the recreation experience. Direct trip

costs represent a generally accepted method of paying for recreation trips.

This relatively neutral measure of value was selected over alternatives such as

an entrance fee or tax in an effort to avoid emotional reaction and protest against the method of valuing fishing quality. As a result, protest responses, which were removed from the analysis, represented less than 5.0 percent of the

sample, well within the Water Resources Council's (1979, 1983) standard of 15.0

percent.

An iterative bidding technique, recommended by the Council, was used to

encourage fishermen to report maximum values, representing the point of indifference between having the amount of income reported or the specific change in quality of the resource. The respondents were asked to react to a

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