The effects of force protection : An idea analysis

Full text

(1)

   

Självständigt  arbete  (15  hp)  

Författare     Program/Kurs  

Emma  Thesslin   OP  SA  12-­‐15  

Handledare   Antal  ord:  9035  

Sofia  Ledberg   Beteckning   Kurskod  

Björn  Brenner     1OP147  

THE  EFFECTS  OF  FORCE  PROTECTION:  AN  IDEA  ANALYSIS    

ABSTRACT  

How  can  we  successfully  complete  our  missions  while  we  are  stuck  in  bunkers?  

A   question   representative   of   a   hot   topic   of   discussion   regarding   the   restrictions   of   force   protection   measures   that   are   placed   on   US   troops   conducting   military   operations   abroad.   The   discussion,   which   peaked   during   the   late   1990s   early   2000s,   was   heavily   weighted   in   one   direction,  namely  claiming  that  force  protection  has  a  negative  impact  on  military  effectiveness.     As   the   claim   generalises   force   protection,   a   concept   that   has   numerous   definitions   and   even   more  interpretations,  it  therefore  seems  unlikely  that  such  a  generalisation  can  be  made.  

This  study  analyses  the  claim  using  an  idea  analysis  method,  questioning  its  sustainability  and   presenting  a  way  of  understanding  its  limitations.  

In  studying  the  circumstances  of  the  reports  that  triggered  this  discussion,  the  analysis  allows  us   to  see  the  limited  relevance  of  the  claim  with  regard  to  the  broader  concept  of  force  protection,   while  acknowledging  its  possible  relevance  regarding  the  specific  aspects  that  are  more  

commonly  associated  with  the  concept.     Nyckelord:    

Force  protection,  military  effectiveness,  idea  analysis.  

(2)

Innehållsförteckning  

1   INTRODUCTION  ...  3  

1.1   PRESENTATION  OF  THE  PROBLEM  ...  4  

1.2   AIM  OF  THE  STUDY  ...  4  

1.3   RESEARCH  QUESTION  ...  4  

1.4   EARLIER  RESEARCH  ...  4  

1.5   SUMMARY  ...  7  

1.6   USE  OF  TERMS  ...  7  

1.7   DISPOSITION  ...  7  

2   THEORY  ...  8  

2.1   THE  COST-­‐BENEFIT  RATIO  ...  8  

2.2   A  MODERNISATION  OF  CLAUSEWITZ  ...  9  

2.3   SUMMARY  ...  10  

3   METHOD  ...  11  

3.1   CHOICE  OF  METHOD  ...  11  

3.2   CONCEPTUALISATION  –  THE  AUTHOR’S  USE  OF  IDEA  ANLYSIS  ...  12  

3.3   MATERIAL  ...  13  

4   ANALYSIS  ...  15  

4.1   CONCEPT  ANALYSIS  ...  15  

4.2   IS  THERE  PROOF  PRESENTED  TO  SUPPORT  THE  CLAIM  AND  IS  THE  PROOF   SUSTAINABLE?  ...  16  

4.3   IS  IT  POSSIBLE  TO  PROVE?  ...  18  

4.4   CONCLUSIONS  ...  19  

5   RECAP  AND  REFLECTIONS  ...  21  

5.1   SUMMARY  OF  THE  STUDY  ...  21  

5.2   REFLECTIONS  ...  21  

5.3   FURTHER  RESEARCH  ...  22  

5.4   A  FINAL  WORD  –  RETURNING  TO  CLAUSEWITZ  ...  22  

LIST  OF  REFERENCES  ...  23  

BOOKS  ...  23   ARTICLES  ...  23   MILITARY  DOCUMENTS  ...  23   ELECTRONIC  SOURCES  ...  23        

(3)

1 INTRODUCTION  

 

“Our  troops  cannot  successfully  complete  their  tasks  if  they  are  required  to  live  in  bunkers   24  hours  a  day.”1    

-­‐ Former  Secretary  of  Defence  William  J.  Perry    

 

Although  taken  out  of  context,  the  quote  quite  clearly  expresses  what  has  become  a   common  opinion  among  US  high-­‐ranking  military  officials  and  politicians  alike.  It  promotes   an  idea  that  the  measures  taken  to  protect  troops  abroad  also  hinder  them  from  achieving   their  military  goals.  The  statement  is  taken  from  a  featured  article  written  by  the  SoD  in  the   aftermath  of  the  terrorist  attacks  on  the  Khobar  Towers  in  1996,  where  19  American  service   members  were  killed  and  hundreds  more  wounded.2  The  tragedy  brought  the  use  of  force   protection  into  the  public  eye,  in  reports,  articles  and  editorials.  The  consensus  is  that   mission  effectiveness  is  compromised  by  force  protection.  Yet  a  clear  definition  of  the   concept  is  seldom  mentioned.          

 

Bergström  and  Boréus  describe  a  ‘concept’  as  a  meeting  point  for  words  and  ideas,  In  other   words  a  concept  is  a  word  or  a  combination  of  words  that  can  have  diverse  meanings.3  Force   protection  is  a  concept  with  a  wide  range  of  definitions  although  being  a  military  concept   there  are  some  standardised  versions.  NATO  defines  force  protection  as:  “All  measures  and   means  to  minimize  the  vulnerability  of  personnel,  facilities,  equipment  and  operations  to   any  threat  and  in  all  situations,  to  preserve  freedom  of  action  and  the  operational  

effectiveness  of  the  force.”4  This  covers  a  very  wide  range  of  elements,  which  includes  the   armour  worn  by  soldiers,  the  location  of  camps,  quick  reaction  units,  medical  evacuation   units,  specific  tactics  aiming  to  protect  military  assets,  vaccinations  before  deployment  and   so  on.  The  list  is  long  and  the  concept  of  force  protection  vague  making  it  difficult  to  

measure  or  study.      

This  study  will  look  at  claims  made  about  force  protection  and  how  valid  and  sustainable   they  actually  are  considering  the  vagueness  of  the  concept  itself.    

 

 

                                                                                                                         

1  W.  J.  Perry,  ‘Force  protection:  Hardening  the  target’.  Defense,  (6),  Arlington  USA,  Superintendent  of   Documents,  1996,  p.  10  

2  Ibid  

3  G.  Berström  and  K.  Boréus,  Textens  mening  och  makt,  Stockholm,  Student  litteratur  AB,  2005,  182    

4  J.  A.  Moreno,  NATO  Glossary  of  terms  and  definitions,  North  Atlantic  Treaty  Organization  NATO  

Standardization  Agency  (NSA),  2008,  section.  2F6  

(4)

1.1 PRESENTATION  OF  THE  PROBLEM  

During  the  late  1990’s  force  protection  and  the  implications  of  its  growing  importance  in   military  operations  became  a  hot  topic.  The  idea  that  force  protection  had  a  negative  impact   on  military  effectiveness  became  a  widely  accepted  argument.  The  problem  is  that  this   argument  was  based  on  specific  elements  of  force  protection  even  though  the  concept   covers  a  much  wider  range  of  elements,  as  previously  mentioned.  This  therefore  puts  the   validity  and  sustainability  of  the  idea  into  question.    

   

1.2 AIM  OF  THE  STUDY  

The  aim  of  this  study  is  to  analyse  the  claim  in  theory  that  force  protection  has  a  negative   impact  on  military  effectiveness.          

 

1.3 RESEARCH  QUESTION  

How  can  we  understand  the  limits  of  the  claim  that  force  protection  negatively  impacts   military  effectiveness?  

 

1.4 EARLIER  RESEARCH  

The  majority  of  research  on  the  subject  of  force  protection  has  been  done  in  the  USA  and   focuses  mainly  on  the  development  of  the  protection  of  US  forces  overseas.  This  may  be  due   to  increased  public  pressure  since  the  Vietnam  War.5    

As  previously  mentioned,  in  1996  the  former  Secretary  of  Defence  William  J.  Perry  wrote  an   article  after  the  incident  at  Khobar  Towers,  where  he  describes  what  he  considers  to  be  the   essence  of  force  protection.  He  believes,  as  do  many  that  it  should  be  considered  as  an   operational  task  and  sees  the  necessity  of  increasing  it,  yet  believes  that  this  should  be  done   in  ways  that  do  not  compromise  the  mission.  He  believed  that  troops  were  being  

encouraged  to  bunker  down  and  hide  behind  force  protection.6  His  article  looks  into  the   future  development  of  force  protection  and  how  it  could  be  developed  to  avoid  the  

seemingly  inevitable  effects  on  operational  ability.7  After  Khobar  towers  and  Perry’s  ensuing   statements,  there  was  a  flood  of  articles  and  studies  on  the  subject  of  protecting  service   members  overseas  and  ‘force  protection’  became  the  phrase  commonly  used.  

The  following  year  an  article  by  Daniel  Ward  published  by  the  Department  of  the  army  HQ   was  released  with  similar  arguments  regarding  how  force  protection  does,  but  should  not   affect  operational  capability.  Ward  also  states  that  the  Department  of  Defence  (DoD)  places   higher  demands  on  commanding  officers  as  force  protection  plays  a  larger  role  in  military   deployment.  He  writes,  “DoD  demands  that  commanders  perform  more  missions  with  fewer                                                                                                                            

5  R.  Smith,  Force  Protection:  Casualties,  Consensus,  and  an  Operational  Commander's  Dilemma,  Newport  USA,   Joint  Military  Operations  Department,  1999    

6  W.  J.  Perry,  ‘Force  protection:  Hardening  the  target’.  Defense,  (6),  Arlington  USA,  Superintendent  of   Documents,  1996  

(5)

resources”8  In  other  words,  according  to  Ward,  measures  taken  within  the  boundaries  of   force  protection  are  having  a  direct  effect  on  the  commanding  officers’  ability  to  meet   political  objectives.  This  is  because  commanders  who  would  previously  concentrate  forces   on  the  worst-­‐case  adversary  must  now  use  their  forces  economically  to  cover  all  possible   scenarios  in  order  to  reduce  friendly  casualties.9  The  idea  of  spreading  the  available  force  to   meet  set  goals  will  indirectly  affect  all  aspects  of  a  mission,  as  there  are  fewer  available   resources  for  any  one  task.    Ward  argues  that  it  is  the  commanding  officer’s  dilemma  to   weigh  the  costs  of  protecting  forces  against  accepting  risk  and  suggests  the  implementation   of  a  force  protection  working  group  to  aid  the  commander  in  his  decision  by  providing  force   protection  related  intelligence.10    

Lieutenant  Colonel  Smith  wrote  a  report  for  the  Joint  Military  Operations  Department   (JMOD)  stating  that  the  American  people  seemed  to  be  developing  less  tolerance  for  

casualties  as  a  result  of  modern,  less  traditional  warfare.  The  report  states  that,  “as  a  result,   operational  commanders  may  find  that  it  will  be  force  protection  failures,  rather  than   battlefield  defeats,  that  deny  America  her  strategic  objectives.”11  This  shows  a  tendency   towards  a  shift  in  the  focus  of  operational  success  from  purely  achieving  strategic  goals,  to   doing  so  with  minimal  casualties.  The  article  goes  on  to  shed  light  on  the  balancing  act   between  force  protection  and  military  missions,  quoting  Lieutenant  General  James  Record   regarding  what  is  necessary  in  the  broad  spectrum  of  military  operations  in  modern  warfare:   “…there  is  a  need  to  strike  an  appropriate  balance  between  Force  Protection  and  other   competing  mission  requirements  …  Even  under  the  best  of  circumstances,  this  is  not  an  easy   balancing  act”.12  

An  article  by  policy  critic  Jeffrey  Record  about  what  he  calls  a  ‘Force  Protection  Fetishism’   arguing  that  the  growing  need  to  protect  US  forces  abroad  is  a  result  of  the  opinion  of  the   elite  of  society  and  of  senior  officers,  not  the  general  public.13  This  argument  is  based  on  a   study  conducted  in  the  USA  in  1999  marshalled  by  the  Project  on  the  Gap  between  Military   and  Civilian  Society.14  Record  states  that  the  “Vietnam  syndrome  …  has  metamorphosed  into   a  Force-­‐protection  fetishism  that  threatens  to  corrupt  American  statecraft  in  the  post-­‐cold-­‐ war  era.”  He  argues  that  there  is  a  growing  unwillingness  to  place  any  political  goals  or   objectives  during  military  interventions  abroad,  ahead  of  the  safety  and  protection  of  the   military  instrument.15  Record  also  states  that  “effective  use  of  force  rests  on  recognition  of                                                                                                                            

8  D.  Ward,  ‘Assessing  force  protection  risk’,  Military  Review,    vol.  77,  no.6,  Fort  Leavenworth  USA,  Department   of  the  Army  Headquarters,  1997,  p.11  

9  Ibid     10  Ibid  

11  R.  Smith,  Force  Protection:  Casualties,  Consensus,  and  an  Operational  Commander's  Dilemma,  Newport  USA,   Joint  Military  Operations  Department,  1999,  p.  2    

12  R.  Smith,  Force  Protection:  Casualties,  Consensus,  and  an  Operational  Commander's  Dilemma,  Newport  USA,   Joint  Military  Operations  Department,  1999,  p.  16  

13  J.  Record,  ‘Force-­‐protection  fetishism’,  Aerospace  Power  Journal,  vol.  14,  no.  2,  Maxwell  AFB,  U.S.   Superintendent  of  Documents,  2000  

14  Ibid     15  Ibid  p.4  

(6)

the  intimate  relationship  military  means  and  political  objective”  16  and  goes  on  to  say  that   this  force  protection  fetishism  corrupts  the  use  of  force  as  it  is  an  obsession  with  keeping  the   military  means  safe  even  at  the  expense  of  the  very  political  objectives  they  are  there  for.     In  2004  the  US  War  Naval  Collage  printed  an  article  by  Richard  A.    Laquement  Jr.  on  casualty-­‐ aversion,  reinforcing  Record’s  idea  of  the  myth  that  the  general  public  in  the  USA  are  not   willing  to  make  sacrifices,  and  how  important  it  is  that  this  widely  accepted  myth  does  not   distort  the  cost-­‐benefit  calculations  of  military  and  civilian  leaders.17  Even  in  this  article  it  is   possible  to  see  the  reoccurring  opinion  opposing  the  restriction  of  military  forces  through   force  protection.  Record  quotes  the  former  Chief  of  Staff  of  the  Army,  General  Edward   Meyer,  “No  commander  likes  to  lose  soldiers,  but  if  he  starts  out  with  [no  casualties]  as  his   goal,  nobody  is  going  to  accomplish  anything.”18  The  article  talks  about  four  main  negative   impacts  that  this  supposed  casualty  aversion  can  have,  one  of  which  is;  ineffective  or   inefficient  execution.  “Belief  that  the  public  cannot  withstand  casualties  can  skew  choices   concerning  the  use  of  force  in  ways  that  cause  operations  to  be  conducted  inefficiently  or   ineffectively.”19  He  goes  on  to  state  that  “Another  aspect  of  this  negative  effect  is  the   manner  in  which  American  armed  forces,  overly  concerned  about  casualties,  pursue  force   protection  and  ‘zero  defects’  to  such  an  extent  that  mission  effectiveness  is  hindered.”20       In  2007  an  article  was  published  on  the  future  of  Force  protection.  Here  the  author  states   that  the  US  and  allied  commanders  confront  the  dual  responsibilities  of  accomplishing  the   mission  and  ensuring  the  safety  of  those  under  their  command  claiming  also  that  these  two   are  inextricably  linked,  “there  is  both  tension  and  synergy  between  these  responsibilities.   Force  protection  is  crucial  to  the  creation  of  circumstances  that  facilitate  military  forces   executing  their  operational  missions.  It  may  well  be  –  that  exposing  both  combat  and   supporting  forces  to  greater  risk  will  result  in  a  more  rapid  achievement  of  the  mission  and   thus  fewer  casualties  in  the  long  run.”21  The  article  goes  on  to  explain  that  however  

important  force  protection  is,  it  must  not  interfere  with  the  accomplishment  of  the  mission.   The  risk  of  force  protection  is  a  ‘garrison  mentality’  where  troops  hide  behind  concrete  and   lose  touch  with  the  enemy  and  the  civilian  population,  a  contact  that  is  a  crucial  element  in   the  success  of  irregular  warfare.22  Furthermore  the  article  explains  that  we  should  focus  on   how  to  maximise  mission  effectiveness,  while  minimising  casualties.  Where  a  risk  

                                                                                                                         

16  J.  Record,  ‘Force-­‐protection  fetishism’,  Aerospace  Power  Journal,  vol.  14,  no.  2,  Maxwell  AFB,  U.S.   Superintendent  of  Documents,  2000,  p.  4  

17  R.  A.  Laquement,  ‘The  casualty-­‐aversion  myth’,  Naval  War  Collage  Review,  vol.  57,  no.  1,  Washington,   Superintendent  of  documents,  2004  

18  Ibid  p.  50   19  Ibid  p.  44   20  Ibid  p.  44  

21  L.  Beckman,  Grundbok  i  Idéanalys  det  kritiska  studiet  av  politiska  texter  och  idéer,  Stockholm,  Santérus   Förelag,  2005,  p.  45  

(7)

assessment  is  made  and  mission  tactics  are  combined  with  “acceptable  risk”  in  regard  to   force  protection  resulting  in  a  successful  mission.23    

1.5 SUMMARY  

There  is  a  lot  more  written  on  the  topic  of  force  protection  and  its  effect  on  military  

effectiveness,  especially  dating  from  the  late  1990’s.  The  articles,  studies  and  reports  above   are  sample  pieces  that  represent  the  general  discussion  and  surrounding  opinions.  The   consensus  is  that  an  idea  of  casualty-­‐aversion  has  grown  in  the  US  which,  whether  it  be  a   myth  or  not,  has  led  to  an  over-­‐use  of  force  protection.  This  over-­‐use  has  hindered  troops   from  completing  their  mission,  suggesting  that  there  is  a  balance  between  the  extent  of   force  protection  used  and  the  effectiveness  of  the  mission.      

 

1.6 USE  OF  TERMS   Military  effectiveness  

Effectiveness  is  simply  producing  a  desired  or  intended  result,  so  in  military  terms  it  can  be   written  as  an  army,  unit  or  soldier  producing  a  result  that  was  previously  intended.  An   intended  result  is  something  that  has  been  planned  for,  a  goal.  Other  phrases  such  as  

mission  effectiveness  are  very  similar  in  meaning  and  in  order  to  minimise  misinterpretation   both  of  these  phrases  will  be  referred  to  in  the  study  as  military  effectiveness  meaning;   reaching  a  military  end-­‐state,  or  goal.        

 

1.7 DISPOSITION  

This  study  is  divided  into  three  main  parts.  First  the  theory  chapter  presents  the  theory  from   its  origins  in  Clausewitz’  ideas  on  the  cost-­‐benefit  ratio  of  war,  to  the  present  balance  of   force  protection  and  military  effectiveness.    Next  is  the  method  chapter,  the  purpose  of   which  is  to  talk  the  reader  through  each  step  of  the  study  regarding  what  methods  have   been  used,  the  boundaries  of  the  study  and  the  overall  thought  process  of  the  author.  The   subsequent  chapter  is  the  actual  analysis;  here  the  reader  will  be  able  to  follow  the  study   from  the  empirical  research  through  the  analytical  steps  presented  in  the  method  chapter  to   the  conclusion.                                                                                                                                          

23  L.  Beckman,  Grundbok  i  Idéanalys  det  kritiska  studiet  av  politiska  texter  och  idéer,  Stockholm,  Santérus   Förelag,  2005  

(8)

2 THEORY  

 

This  chapter  will  first  present  a  theory  from  Clausewitz’  series  of  books  “On  War”,  about   balancing  what  is  risked  against  what  stands  to  gained  in  war.  The  chapter  then  goes  on  to   show  the  relevance  and  presence  of  Clausewitz  today  in  a  modernisation  of  the  theory.  A   summary  of  the  theory  can  be  found  at  the  end  of  the  chapter.      

 

2.1 THE  COST-­‐BENEFIT  RATIO  

Throughout  Clausewitz’  work,  he  often  returns  to  a  cost-­‐benefit  concept  in  which  he  claims   that  risk  is  a  fundamental  part  of  war  where  one  must  weigh  the  pros  and  cons,  in  other   words  the  costs  and  negative  implications  of  war  compared  to  the  benefits  and  political  gain   to  be  achieved  by  winning  the  war.  Clausewitz  states  “war  is  no  act  of  blind  passion,  but  is   dominated  by  the  political  objective,  therefore  the  value  of  that  object  determines  the   measure  of  the  sacrifices  by  which  it  is  to  be  purchased.”24  He  goes  on  to  explain  how  this  is   not  only  in  regard  to  the  extent  of  the  sacrifice  but  also  the  duration,  how  much  time  and   effort  is  the  object  worth?  Clausewitz  also  states  that  as  soon  as  the  value  of  the  political   objective  becomes  less  than  the  cost  of  the  means  to  attain  it,  the  object  should  be  given   up.25    

War,  according  to  Clausewitz  is  not  merely  a  political  act,  but  is  a  political  instrument,  a   means  to  carry  out  political  will.  “Political  view  is  the  objective,  war  is  the  means.”26  In  order   to  reach  the  political  objectives  one  must  be  willing  to  take  the  calculated  risk,  because   without  risking  anything  it  is  difficult  to  achieve  anything.  This  argument  is  further  reinforced   in  Christopher  Griffin’s  article  From  limited  war  to  limited  victory:  Clausewitz  and  allied  

strategy  in  Afghanistan.  In  this  article  Griffin  describes  how  the  US  entered  into  the  Afghan  

war  with  very  high  political  aims  but  with  a  mind  to  use,  relatively  speaking,  very  little  force   making  success  near  to  impossible.    

Looking  at  the  costs  of  war  and  the  benefits  of  war  during  battles  in  the  early  20th  century  it   is  easier  to  distinguish  those  costs  and  benefits  than  those  of  today.  Territory  was  a  clear   physical  objective,  or  the  disarmament  of  an  army  a  clear  political  goal,  and  lives,  equipment   and  even  some  battles  lost  were  the  sacrifices  made  to  achieve  such  goals.  In  today’s  

modern  warfare  it  is  not  as  easy.  The  political  objectives  of  today  and  tomorrow  include   winning  hearts  and  minds,  stabilising  governments  and  mentoring  armed  forces.27  So  how   do  we  know  if  the  cost  benefit  ratio  is  balanced?  Military  effectiveness  is  a  much-­‐discussed   topic,  asking  the  question,  are  we  using  the  resources  we  have  in  an  effective  way  to  meet   our  objectives?  The  resources  referred  to,  range  from  manpower  to  technology  to  weaponry                                                                                                                            

24  K.  von  Clausewitz,  On  War,  trans.  J.  J.  Graham,  USA,  BN  Publishing,  2007,  p.  22   25  Ibid  p.  22  

26  Ibid  p.  18  

27  ‘The  future  of  Force  protection’,  Military  technology,  vol.  31,  no.  8,  Bonn  Germany,  Moench   Verlagsgesellschaft  mbH,  2007  

(9)

systems.  These  resources  are  thus  the  cost,  if  lost.  In  order  to  minimise  these  costs,   resources  must  be  protected.  Therein  lies  the  need  for  force  protection.  

2.2 A  MODERNISATION  OF  CLAUSEWITZ    

The  relevance  of  Clausewitz  when  discussing  modern  warfare  has  been  in  question  since  the   cold  war,  many  claim  that  his  tactics  apply  to  wars  where  the  aim  is  annihilation  of  the   enemy  and  are  not  relevant  in  post-­‐cold  war  conflicts28.  Yet  there  are  many  scholars  who   claim  that  Clausewitz’  critics  only  look  at  specific  tactics  and  fail  to  see  the  relevance  of  the   fundamental  matters  presented  in  his  work29  and  there  ever-­‐lasting  applicability,  even  in  the   non-­‐traditional  wars  fought  today.    

Lieutenant  Colonel  Smith  of  the  US  Marine  Corps  writes  in  a  report  that  since  the  US  has   become  involved  in  less  traditional  fighting  roles  the  people  of  the  USA  have  less  tolerance   for  casualties  as  a  result.30  It  would  appear  to  be  true  for  a  number  of  western  countries  that   societies’  tolerance  of  casualties  in  war  has  decreased  during  the  past  century.  There  is   much  speculation  as  to  what  has  caused  this  reaction,  one  might  argue  that  it  is  a  result  of   the  extreme  cost  of  two  world  wars  and  the  following  threat  of  the  cold  war,  or  one  might   say  it  is  the  natural  evolution  of  war.  Smith  claims  that  for  the  USA  it  is  a  result  of  the  war  in   Vietnam,  while  Beirut  and  Somalia  are  evidence  of  the  US  pulling  out  when  casualty  

numbers  started  to  increase.31    

Force  protection  has  become  a  growing  part  of  military  operations  in  the  latter  part  of  the   20th  century;  this  could  be  a  direct  reaction  to  the  decreasing  tolerance  of  returning  body   bags.  The  phrase  force  protection  connotes  bunkers  and  barbed  wire32  and  has  triggered  a   discussion  regarding  its  negative  impact  on  the  mobility  and  effectiveness  of  missions.     Smith,  as  previously  mentioned,  quotes  a  Lieutenant  General  Record  who,  in  discussing  the   broad  spectrum  of  military  objectives,  states  that  “In  each  of  these  diverse  operations,  there   is  a  need  to  strike  an  appropriate  balance  between  Force  Protection  and  other  competing   mission  requirements.”33  This  implies  that  an  increase  in  force  protection  leads  to  a  decrease   in  other  mission  requirements.  In  other  words,  the  more  focus  is  placed  on  protecting  the   forces  the  less  resources  are  available  to  reach  mission  effectiveness.    

NATO  defines  Force  Protection  (FP)  as:  “All  measures  and  means  to  minimize  the   vulnerability  of  personnel,  facilities,  equipment  and  operations  to  any  threat  and  in  all                                                                                                                            

28  C.  Griffin,  ‘From  Limited  War  to  Limited  Victory:  Clausewitz  and  Allied  Strategy  in  Afghanistan’,  Contemporary  

Security  Policy,  vol.  35,  no.  3,  Published  online  22  Sep  2014,  Routledge,  2014  

29  C.  Griffin,  ‘From  Limited  War  to  Limited  Victory:  Clausewitz  and  Allied  Strategy  in  Afghanistan’,  Contemporary  

Security  Policy,  vol.  35,  no.  3,  Published  online  22  Sep  2014,  Routledge,  2014  

30  R.  Smith,  Force  Protection:  Casualties,  Consensus,  and  an  Operational  Commander's  Dilemma,  Newport  USA,   Joint  Military  Operations  Department,  1999  

31  Ibid    

32  ‘The  future  of  Force  protection’,  Military  technology,  vol.  31,  no.  8,  Bonn  Germany,  Moench   Verlagsgesellschaft  mbH,  2007  

33  R.  Smith,  Force  Protection:  Casualties,  Consensus,  and  an  Operational  Commander's  Dilemma,  Newport  USA,   Joint  Military  Operations  Department,  1999,  p.  16  

(10)

situations,  to  preserve  freedom  of  action  and  the  operational  effectiveness  of  the  force.”34  In   other  words,  according  to  NATO,  FP  should  be  an  aid  to  the  operational  effectiveness  of  the   force.  Yet  many  believe  that  the  focus  of  international  military  interventions  has  shifted  and   become  FP  focussed,  which  in  turn  hinders  rather  than  aids  the  very  freedom  of  action  and   operational  effectiveness  it  is  supposed  to  preserve.  Metaphorically  speaking,  you  can   protect  a  child  from  the  threats  of  the  world  by  locking  it  in  its  room,  but  you  cannot  then   expect  the  child  to  achieve  anything  in  that  world.    

Returning  to  policy  critic  Jeffrey  Record’s  ‘Force  Protection  Fetishism’,  that  is  exactly  what  is   happening.35  The  result  being  that  today’s  western  soldier  is  bunkering  down  behind  

concrete  walls  because  “a  lack  of  loss  –  not  mission  accomplishment  –  became  the  standard   for  judging  the  success  of  allied  forces”36.  Record  means  that  protecting  troops  has  become   so  important  and  nothing  is  being  risked  because  mission  accomplishment  has  become  a   secondary  goal,  that  it  is  no  longer  possible  to  achieve  political  aim.      

2.3 SUMMARY    

To  summarise,  Clausewitz  claims  that  the  military  is  an  extension  of  a  political  arm,  a  means   to  achieve  political  objectives.  In  order  to  reach  these  political  objectives  one  must  take  the   risk  of  sacrifices.  However  the  cost  in  sacrifice  must  not  outweigh  the  value  of  the  target,  if   that  is  the  case  then  the  target  must  be  abandoned.  Today  it  seems  that  nations  are  not   willing  to  risk  enough  to  achieve  their  goals.  Alternatively,  they  are  readjusting  goals  to   better  suit  the  political  will  of  a  casualty-­‐free  war.  A  high  focus  is  being  placed  on  force   protection  causing  armies  to  bunker  down  in  high-­‐walled  camps  and  only  conduct  low-­‐risk   operations  thus  making  mission  accomplishment  almost  impossible.    

                                                                                                                                                 

34  J.  A.  Moreno,  NATO  Glossary  of  terms  and  definitions,  North  Atlantic  Treaty  Organization  NATO   Standardization  Agency  (NSA),  2008,  section.  2F6

35  J.  Record,  ‘Force-­‐protection  fetishism’,  Aerospace  Power  Journal,  vol.  14,  no.  2,  Maxwell  AFB,  U.S.   Superintendent  of  Documents,  2000  

(11)

3 METHOD  

 

This  study  aims  to  test  the  claim  made  in  the  theory  chapter,  in  order  to  do  so  the  author   has  used  a  variant  of  idea-­‐analysis.  A  brief  introduction  to  idea-­‐analysis  will  be  presented   first  in  this  chapter  followed  by  how  the  author  has  chosen  to  use  the  method  in  the  study.   Furthermore  the  limitations  and  a  source  evaluation    of  the  study  will  be  presented  and   motivated..      

 

3.1 CHOICE  OF  METHOD  

Initially  a  qualitative  text  analysis  was  conducted  in  order  to  identify  the  theme,  which  is   force  protection’s  negative  impact  on  military  effectiveness.  Why  a  qualitative  text  analysis   is  necessary  is  because,  although  the  concept  of  force  protection  is  often  mentioned,  its   influence  and  impacts  on  the  effectiveness  of  mission  is  not  always  the  main  focus  of  the   texts.  The  text  must  therefore  be  read  thoroughly  to  access  the  opinions  regarding  this   particular  topic.    

 

Berström  and  Boréus  describe  an  idea  as  a  construction  of  thoughts  that  represent  an   understanding  of  reality  or  an  understanding  of  how  something  ought  to  be  done37.  Based   on  this  notion  the  author  has  identified  the  claim  that  force  protection  has  a  negative  impact   on  military  effectiveness  as  an  idea,  therefore  idea  analysis  is  clearly  a  relevant  tool  to  test   that  claim.  The  more  popular,  related  method,  ideology  analysis,  was  also  considered,   although  according  to  Bergström  and  Boréus  an  ideology  is  a  group  or  system  of  ideas,   where  as  this  study  looks  at  one  single  claim  or  idea,  making  idea  analysis  more  suitable.        

There  are  three  analysis  techniques  used  when  conducting  an  idea  analysis,  the  first  is  a   concept38  analysis  meaning  to  simply  explain  the  concepts,  this  is  an  important  first  step  in   idea  analysis  and  will  be  used  as  a  first  step  in  this  study.  The  second  is  a  rationalisation   analysis,  this  is  commonly  used  to  analyse  a  group  of  arguments39,  and  it  is  therefore  not   suitable  in  this  study.  The  final  technique  is  content  analysis,  which  is  a  quantitative  method   used  to  analyse  large  quantities  of  material.  Again  this  does  not  apply  to  this  study.    

 

Idea  analysis  is  generally  divided  into  three  different  types  of  analysis:  descriptive  idea   analysis40,  idea  critique41,  and  interpretive  idea  analysis42.  A  descriptive  idea  analyst  aims  to,   in  a  more  scientific  and  in-­‐depth  manner,  describe  the  subject.  In  other  words  the  analyst   adds  a  scientific  meaning  and  new  elements  to  the  topic  in  question.  Idea  critique  is  often                                                                                                                            

37  G.  Berström  and  K.  Boréus,  Textens  mening  och  makt,  Stockholm,  Student  litteratur  AB,  2005,  p.  150   38  Ibid  p.  31  

39  Ibid  p.  38  

40  L.  Beckman,  Grundbok  i  Idéanalys  det  kritiska  studiet  av  politiska  texter  och  idéer,  Stockholm,  Santérus   Förelag,  2005,  p.  48  

41  Ibid  p.  55   42  Ibid  p.  80  

(12)

used  when  questioning  or  challenging  a  political  or  ideological  text.  It  does  not  look  at  the   ‘what’  or  ‘why’  of  something  but  rather  questions  the  validity,  sustainability  or  plausibility  of   the  subject.  Interpretive  idea  analysis  is  a  tool  used  for  example  to  explain  how  political   ideas  can  be  a  result  of  social  or  economic  processes  in  society.    

 

Because  this  study  takes  a  stand  against  the  claim  regarding  the  negative  impact  of  force   protection,  questioning  its  sustainability,  the  most  suited  method  is  idea  critique.  Idea   critique  itself  is  divided  into  the  three  elements  mentioned  earlier,  testing  validity43,  

sustainability44  and  plausibility45.  This  study  will  look  at  all  three  of  these  aspects  to  a  greater   or  lesser  extent  although  the  focus  of  the  study  will  be  on  the  sustainability  of  the  idea  as  it   is  exactly  that  which  is  in  question.  According  to  Ludvig  Beckman’s  book  “Grunder  i  

idéanalys”,  Vedung  is  often  referred  to  regarding  idea  analysis.  Vedung  brings  analysing  the   sustainability  of  an  idea  or  claim  down  to  three  questions:  

   

Ø Is  there  proof  presented  to  support  the  claim?   Ø Is  the  proof  sustainable?  

Ø Is  it  possible  to  prove?    

 

To  summarise,  the  study  will  start  by  using  the  analysis  technique  –  concept  analysis,  in   order  to  identify  and  define  the  concept  of  force  protection  in  order  to  better  understand  its   meaning  and  use.  After  which,  using  the  three  questions  as  a  base,  the  author  will  analyse   the  claim  that  force  protection  has  a  negative  impact  on  military  effectiveness.  Through  this   analysis  it  will  be  possible  to  determine  the  sustainability  of  the  claim  and  help  create  an   understanding  of  its  limitations.    

 

3.2 CONCEPTUALISATION  –  THE  AUTHOR’S  USE  OF  IDEA  ANLYSIS  

Analysts  often  use  the  metaphor,  looking  at  something  through  “glasses”46,  for  example,   looking  at  society  with  gender  glasses  to  analyse  equality  issues.  Basically  this  means  looking   at  the  subject  of  analysis  from  a  specific  perspective  in  order  to  minimise  other  impressions   that  may  be  irrelevant  to  the  study.  In  this  case  the  author  has  chosen  an  opposition  

perspective  because  the  best  way  to  understand  and  test  an  argument  is  to  argue  against  it.   This  does  however  mean  that  a  study  runs  the  risk  of  being  subjective  as  the  author  who   conducts  the  analysis  from  an  opposing  opinion  becomes  judge  and  jury.  This  study  is  an   idea  analysis  however,  which  aims  to  test  the  sustainability  of  the  claim  rather  than  prove  it   incorrect  thus  minimising  the  possible  effects  of  the  bias  of  the  author  and  increasing  the   reliability  of  the  study.    

                                                                                                                         

43  L.  Beckman,  Grundbok  i  Idéanalys  det  kritiska  studiet  av  politiska  texter  och  idéer,  Stockholm,  Santérus   Förelag,  2005,  p.  57  

44  Ibid  p.  65   45  Ibid  p.  68   46  Ibid  p.  77  

(13)

 

Idea  analysis  itself,  specifically  idea  critique,  cannot  prove  or  disprove  something  tangible,  it   can  only  test  if  an  argument,  idea  or  claim  holds.  It  is  therefore  a  good  method  of  raising   reasonable  doubt  as  to  the  sustainability  of  an  argument  but  it  does  not  in  itself  provide  a   counter  argument.  It  is  therefore  important  not  to  see  this  study  as  proving  the  claim  false   but  rather  opening  the  reader’s  eyes  to  the  limitations  of  the  claim.  For  a  larger  study  that   may  aim  to  provide  a  counter  argument  or  scientific  proof  against  a  claim,  idea  analysis   might  be  a  good  place  to  start  but  would  need  to  be  complemented  with  other  research   methods.  

 

The  questions  that  create  a  base  for  the  analysis  will  be  used  in  the  following  way  in  relation   to  the  study.    

1. Is  there  proof  presented  to  support  the  claim?  Here  the  author  will  consider,  not   only  the  main  text  material  but  also  the  research  carried  out  to  date  looking  for  any   examples  of  actual  events  in  support  of  the  claim.    

2. Is  the  proof  sustainable?  This  question  examines  the  proof  presented  from  the   above  question  and  analyse,  not  the  reliability  of  the  proof,  but  the  validity  of  its  use.   If  at  this  point  the  proof  raises  reasonable  doubt  or  is  lacking  in  any  way,  it  may  affect   the  sustainability  of  the  claim.    

3. Is  it  possible  to  prove  the  claim?  Here  the  author  will  look  at  whether  it  is  in  fact   possible  to  prove  or  disprove  the  claim  and  what  implications  that  might  have  on  our   understanding  of  its  limitations.    

 

3.3 MATERIAL  

Based  on  its  presence  in  research  done  prior  to  this  study,  the  author  has  identified  the   claim  as  having  been  made  by  a  wide  range  of  US  scholars,  politicians  and  high-­‐ranking   officers.  One  may  therefor  conclude  that  it  is  the  general  opinion  of  senior  US  officials  rather   than  the  opinion  of  one  individual.  This  does  of  course  bear  with  it  the  risk  of  compromising   the  reliability.  Although  as  it  is  not  possible  to  include  the  opinion  of  every  high-­‐ranking   official  in  the  USA,  the  author  has  used  as  many  different  sources  as  time  would  allow  in   order  to  increase  the  reliability  of  the  study.  As  the  study  analyses  a  claim  representing  the   general  opinion  of  a  certain  group  and  not  a  specific  individual,  the  material  this  study   examines  is  a  collection  of  reports  and  articles  written  by  that  group,  many  of  which  have   already  been  mentioned  in  the  introduction  chapter.    

 

The  majority  of  the  material  to  be  used  in  the  analysis  is  from  the  late  1990s  to  the  early   2000s,  because  during  this  period  force  protection  became  a  hot  topic  in  the  USA.  This  does   not  affect  the  study  as  such,  as  it  still  aims  to  shed  light  on  the  limitations  of  such  a  claim,   but  one  must  take  into  account  that  more  recent  studies  may  have  been  conducted  without   the  author’s  knowledge  arguing  against  the  claim,  thus  detracting  from  its  relevance  as  the   general  opinion  of  high-­‐ranking  US  officials  today.    

(14)

 

The  texts  that  have  been  chosen  are  not  written  in  hindsight  but  rather  written  about  

contemporary  topics  and  refer  to  cases  that  have  not  long  passed,  deducting  from  the  risk  of   becoming  invalid  due  to  a  times  lapse  between  events  and  the  written  sources.  Although   many  of  the  texts  are  written  by  high-­‐ranking  US  military  officials  they  have  been  collected   from  different  publications  and  different  branches  within  the  military  in  order  to  ensure   their  independence  from  one  another,  again  increasing  their  reliability.  The  author  has  also   aimed  to,  as  much  as  possible,  use  first-­‐hand  sources  in  the  form  of  reports  and  articles   written  by  members  of  the  group  making  the  claim.  Keeping  the  sources  as  close  to  the   origin  as  possible  increases  its  authenticity.      

   

The  NATO  definition  is  used  in  places  throughout  this  study  as  a  reference  for  the  definition   of  force  protection.  The  choice  of  the  NATO  definition  as  opposed  to  the  numerous  others   that  exist  is  based  on  the  wide  use  of  standardised  NATO  definitions.  Many  countries  adopt   the  NATO  definitions  in  their  doctrines  in  order  to  ease  combined  operations  and  increase   interoperability.  It  is  also  the  principal  definition  used  by  the  US  armed  forces,  therefore  the   NATO  definition  is  relevant  when  examining  the  force  protection  concept  in  NATO  countries.                                            

(15)

4 ANALYSIS  

 

In  this  chapter  the  analysis  will  be  presented  as  a  discussion  using  the  method  mentioned  in   the  previous  chapter  as  a  guide.  The  four  steps  (concept  analysis  and  the  three  questions)   will  be  used  as  headings  throughout  making  it  easier  to  follow  the  stages  of  analysis.  A   summary  and  conclusion  will  be  presented  in  the  final  chapter.    

 

4.1 CONCEPT  ANALYSIS  

So  what  exactly  is  force  protection?  Looking  at  the  definitions  of  the  words  themselves,   ‘force’  meaning  a  physical  strength  or  power  as  a  result  of  movement  or  action  and  

‘protection’  meaning  defending  or  keeping  safe  and  out  of  harm’s  way.  The  force  in  this  case   is  the  military  force,  in  other  words  the  physical  strength  of  the  military’s  movement  or   actions.  Force  protection  is  therefore  the  defence  or  safekeeping  of  that  physical  strength.   Although  according  to  the  literature  it  stretches  from  its  widest  sense  as  “the  protection  of   military  forces  in  all  environments”47,  to  the  much  more  elaborate  NATO  definition;  “All   measures  and  means  to  minimize  the  vulnerability  of  personnel,  facilities,  equipment  and   operations  to  any  threat  and  in  all  situations,  to  preserve  freedom  of  action  and  the   operational  effectiveness  of  the  force.”48  There  are  many  variations  of  the  definition  and   some  may  be  more  inclusive  than  others.      

Here  are  just  some  examples  of  equipment,  measures  and  forces  mentioned  in  previous   studies  that  come  under  the  force  protection  umbrella;  helmets,  body  armour,  

counteractions  against  an  enemy  attacking  friendly  forces,  rules  of  engagement,  preventive   medicine,  personnel  recovery,  medical  evacuation  readiness,  and  quick  reaction  units.  All  of   these  factors,  and  many  more  can  be  considered  a  part  of  the  concept  force  protection,   although,  as  mentioned,  not  every  definition  is  all-­‐inclusive.  For  example  Ward  quotes  the   Universal  Joint  Task  List’s  definition  of  force  protection  and  it  does  not  include  preventive   medicine  or  rules  of  engagement  yet  both  are  considered  elements  in  the  protection  of   military  forces.49  

As  mentioned  in  the  introduction,  a  concept  is  a  combination  of  words,  in  this  case,  ‘force   protection’,  that  can  have  varied  meanings.  Therefore  what  defines  a  concept  is  its  relation   to  the  context  in  which  it  is  found.  Force  protection,  being  a  military  concept,  will  always  be   affected  by  the  social  context  of  the  military.  Depending  of  course  on  the  reader  the  word   military  may  automatically  trigger  thinking  in  terms  of  armies  and  war.  The  phrase  force   protection  thus  automatically  becomes  associated  with  the  most  common  connotations  of                                                                                                                            

47  ‘The  future  of  Force  protection’,  Military  technology,  vol.  31,  no.  8,  Bonn  Germany,  Moench   Verlagsgesellschaft  mbH,  2007,  p.  46  

48  J.  A.  Moreno,  NATO  Glossary  of  terms  and  definitions,  North  Atlantic  Treaty  Organization  NATO   Standardization  Agency  (NSA),  2008,  section.  2F6

49  D.  Ward,  ‘Assessing  force  protection  risk’,  Military  Review,  vol.  77,  no.6,  Fort  Leavenworth  USA,  Department   of  the  Army  Headquarters,  1997  

(16)

the  word  military  i.e.  armies  and  war.  This  may  explain  why  other  aspects  of  force  protection   such  as  personnel  recovery,  medical  evacuations  and  preventive  medicine  that  are  not   generally  the  first  thing  to  be  associated  with  war,  are  often  excluded  from  the  perception  of   the  phrase  ‘force  protection’.  Another  possible  reason  for  the  distorted  association  could  be   that  force  protection  has,  in  the  past,  been  wrongly  identified  as  synonymous  with  anti-­‐ terrorism  when  force  protection  actually  covers  a  much  broader  scope  of  resources.50    

 

4.2 IS  THERE  PROOF  PRESENTED  TO  SUPPORT  THE  CLAIM  AND  IS  THE  PROOF   SUSTAINABLE?  

As  explained  in  the  method  chapter,  what  the  author  is  looking  for  by  way  of  proof,  are   examples  that  back  up  the  claim  that  force  protection  has  a  negative  impact  on  military   effectiveness.    

 

The  article  written  by  the  former  secretary  of  defence,  is  a  reflection  on  the  failings  of  force   protection  at  Khobar  Towers  and  a  proposal  for  its  future  development.  Perry  states  that   troops  cannot  complete  tasks  from  behind  bunker  walls  and  asks  “how  then  can  we   accomplish  our  missions  without  compromising  their  success  or  abandoning  them  

altogether?”51  The  example  given  here  is  not  based  on  reality  but  on  common  sense;  it  is   impossible  to  complete  a  task  that  requires  physical  presence  at  a  different  location  if  one  is   stuck  behind  a  wall.  The  fact  that  Perry  uses  this  as  an  example  implies  that  he  believes  it  is   precisely  that  element  which  is  the  problem  with  force  protection.  Furthermore  the  

implication  of  a  suggested  change  in  force  protection  procedures  implies  that  it  was  not   sufficient  at  the  time  the  article  was  written.      

 

Perry  has  not  presented  any  proof  in  the  form  of  examples  of  actual  events  in  his  article;  his   proof  is  based  on  common  sense,  which  begs  the  question  as  to  what  his  claim  is  based  on.   As  stated,  of  course  hiding  behind  walls  makes  it  difficult  to  complete  a  task,  but  there  is  no   proof  supporting  this  case,  just  a  suggestion  of  it.  Also  Perry’s  example  of  bunkers  refers  to  a   part  of  force  protection  that  is  protective  infrastructure.  When  talking  about  force  

protection  he  does  not  mention  the  already  existing  elements,  which  did  in  fact  work  at   Khobar  towers,  namely  the  reaction  of  the  forces,  the  buddy  system  for  first  hand  medical   treatment  and  the  subsequent  medical  evacuations.  These  were  mentioned  earlier  in  the   article  but  not  as  a  part  of  a  functioning  force  protection  system.    

 

One  of  the  main  points  made  by  Lieutenant  Colonel  Smith  in  his  report  is  summarised  by  a   quote  from  Lieutenant  General  James  Record,  (for  full  quote  see  the  introduction  chapter).   The  quote  refers  to  a  balance  of  resources,  stating  that  in  modern  warfare  there  is  a  need  to                                                                                                                            

50  Air  Force  Doctrine,  Annex  3-­‐10  Force  protection,  USA,  Curtis  e.  Lemay  centre  for  doctrine  development  and   education    

51  W.  J.  Perry,  ‘Force  protection:  Hardening  the  target’.  Defense,  (6),  Arlington  USA,  Superintendent  of   Documents,  1996  

Figur

Updating...

Referenser

Updating...

Relaterade ämnen :